Archive for the 'News & Notices' Category

Pānui, 8 Hūrae 2014

Kia ora,

Ko tēnei te wiki o te Reo Māori. Whakanuia te reo e tātou mā/ Let’s together celebrate Te Reo Māori.

We’ve heard about lots of exciting activities and events celebrating te reo and Māori culture more broadly through waiata, kapa haka, korero and ngā whakaaturanga. Check out City Gallery Wellington’s Toi Te Reo late night of activities, and the Dunedin City Council waiata group performing at Toitū today. We’re following Te Kupu o te Wiki – the word of the week – and Te Wiki o te reo Māori on Facebook. We’re also enjoying some informal te reo lessons with Wellington colleagues – kapai! For online resources see Te Kete Ipurangi (NZ Curriculum online) and 100 Maori words every New Zealander should know, complete with sound files for pronunciation.

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We loved the photos from Waipu Museum’s recent Art’n’Tartan wearable art awards – there are some on the website and a whole gallery by the photographer.

In the UK, the #museumcuts (check this on Twitter) continue to bite. According to the UK Museums Journal and a report by the Prospect union, sponsors are reducing support, councils are slashing opening hours, and yet another council is planning to sell a high-value collection object. Northampton Borough Council has been sanctioned by the UK Museums Association for putting the ancient Egyptian statue of Sekhemka up for sale with an estimate of £4-6m, and a Save Sekhemka Action Group sprang up. The 10 July Christies sale was challenged by the Egyptian government, but went ahead and Sekhemka fetched nearly £16m. The fallout has been intense, with donors quoted saying they will never again gift objects to the museum.

Back home, we’re all gearing up for the centenary of the start of WW1, which NZ joined on 5 August 1914. Auckland Museum has a series of exhibitions and events, including a re-enactment of the New Zealand Governor, Lord Liverpool, reading a telegram from King George V to a crowd of 15,000 people gathered at Parliament. The telegram expressed the King’s appreciation for the solidarity of his overseas dominions after Britain declared war on Germany – to which Lord Liverpool responded with NZ’s commitment to make any sacrifice necessary, officially entering us into the war alongside Britain.

Mauriora,

Nā Phillipa māua ko Talei

News Update 8 July, 2014

Kia Ora,

Our MA15 conference planning team in Dunedin are putting together an exciting programme on the theme of Communicating Culture. On a visit to Dunedin last week Phillipa visited hosts Otago Museum, and met with the folk from the other museums and galleries who are contributing to the programme. Look out for more information, a call for proposals, events at Toitū and Dunedin Public Art Gallery, visits and tours – complete with powhiri, bagpipes and southern hospitality. We have penciled in 6-8 May 2015, although this may change depending on the availability of our keynote speaker(s).

Matariki-1

Congratulations to Olveston for topping the NZ list of Landmarks in the 2014 tripadvisor.com Traveller’s Choice Awards. Awarded on the basis of visitor reviews on the Tripadvisor website, with a 97% satisfaction level (the highest in the country), Olveston has been ranked #1 in the top 10 list. Olveston is also ranked #5 in the Top 25 list of South Pacific Landmarks, the only NZ entity included in the list (tipped by Sydney Opera House and Harbour Bridge). The very favourable media coverage of the award in print, online, tv and radio, has resulted in great exposure for the house. For the complete lists, visit http://www.tripadvisor.co.nz or read Dunedin landmark beats out Sky Tower.

Looking at the last two weeks media reports, we wish we could have gone to all the wonderful and imaginative Matariki events around the country. Now there’s a new raft or offerings for the school holidays – we hope they’re well-attended and appreciated. We’re also seeing a growing number of WW1 events and exhibitions as the centenary gets closer. Many museums are researching local WW1 stories, and the National Army Museum has enlisted Sir Peter Jackson’s expertise to plan its Western Front battlefield experience. We recommend the resources on the official MCH WW100 website, where its easy to list your museum and gallery projects and events.

Local politics continues to have a direct effect on museums and galleries. In Whangarei, the council has decided to can the controversial Hundertwasser Art Centre project despite the funding threshhold being met, and in Oamaru, the council is to investigate merging the Forrester Gallery and North Otago Museum on the Forrester site. MTG Hawke’s Bay is still in the news over budget and visitation. We’re currently doing some research on museum and gallery governance, to see if there are structures and patterns which we can analyse and learn from so that museums can be better positioned to survive and thrive in their own local contexts. This research will feed into our next sector survey later this year.

And if you’re in Wellington we can personally recommend the City Gallery’s current exhibition Seung Yul Oh: MOAMOA, A Decade. As well as interactive inflatable objects and large fibreglass birds that rock and chime (Oddooki, commissioned by Te Papa 2008), there’s The Ability to Blow Themselves Up. Check out the City Gallery staff practising in this online video.

Ngā mihi,
Phillipa and Talei

 

News Update, 24 June 2014

Kia ora

Congratulations to the Air Force Museum and Rotorua Museum. The Air Force Museum’s new wing was one of 64 finalists in 10 categories at the 2014 Property Industry Awards. They earned an award of excellence and won best in category for tourism and leisure property. The judging process involved inspections and assessments that considered all aspects of each project from the design and construction phase, the innovation and vision evident through to the financial performance, user satisfaction and environmental impact and seismic rating of the completed development – a deserved recognition for both the museum and architects Warren and Mahoney.

Rotorua Minecraft

MINECRAFT MASTERMIND: Alex Pace (right) with his Minecraft creation of the Rotorua Museum. He is pictured with brother Nathan. PHOTO/STEPHEN PARKER

Rotorua Museum has added to its success in the NZ Museum Awards with another four awards in the past year: Best Direct Marketing Campaign with The Edge in the national radio awards for last year’s same-sex wedding promotion; Hospitality Excellence Award in the Rotorua Business Excellence Awards; a TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence Award; and their 80-strong team of volunteer guides were runners-up in the 2013 Trustpower Spirit of Rotorua Community Award. They have also been in the news for a minecraft replica.

The news lately has had a lot about museums. As well as the good news – such as capital grants totaling $4.1m to museums in Akaroa, Chatham Islands and Waitangi – there has been criticism of Te Papa and MTG Hawke’s Bay. In the case of MTG, it stems from a report commissioned by the Napier City Council, which was to investigate “the level of present revenue and expenditure performance” and “unexpected results from the redevelopment, especially insufficient storage…” The Independent Review attempts to benchmark MTG’s performance, and propose ‘rescue remedies’, Being commissioned by council, it does not address the expectation gap between the previous council’s plans of 3+ years ago, and the new council’s current agenda. However, the council is ‘looking forward to a positive future for MTG Hawke’s Bay’, so as long as they don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater, and the media don’t do too much damage to their public reputation, we’re hopeful that will be the case.

One of the consultants who had worked on the McDermott Miller review of MTG Hawke’s Bay was Michael Volkerling. Known to many in the museum and gallery world in his past roles at the Arts Council, the Museum of New Zealand project, as well as his academic and cultural policy work, Michael had attended our MA14 conference in Napier. Sadly, Michael passed away unexpectedly earlier this month at his home in Sydney. A service was held for him at Wellington’s Old St Paul’s today, where he was remembered fondly by his family, friends and colleagues.

Police Museum Director Rowan Carroll in their new armoury

Police Museum Director Rowan Carroll in their new armoury

This a quieter time of year for us here at MA, so last Friday afternoon we got out of the office for some visits. We took a quick look at the excellent exhibitions on at Pataka (we particularly enjoyed Fiona Pardington’s EREWHON: Left for Dead in The Field of Dreams) and then carried on to the Police Museum to check out their new storage. This project has carved all sorts of useful space out of a rather inflexible building and brought their facilities up to environmentally acceptable standard. On our way back in to town we also stopped in at NZ Micrographics and got a full tour of the fascinating giant scanners and cool things they do – give them a call if you’re in the area.

Andy Fenton and Sheryl Sporle-Fahey showing Phillipa Tocker and Lillian Bayly-McCredie around NZMS

Andy Fenton and Sheryl Sporle-Fahey showing Phillipa Tocker and Lillian Bayly-McCredie around NZMS

A Washington Post Blog reported last week that there are more museums in the US than there are McDonalds and Starbucks combined. We ran the stats and discovered the same is true here. In fact there are more museums (c450) in New Zealand than there are McDonalds, Starbucks, KFCs and Burger Kings combined (332) – fast culture, not fast food!

Ngā mihi,
Phillipa and Talei

 

News Update 12 June, 2014

Having just come back from Australia, I have been thinking about New Zealand museums and galleries in relation to international issues. It seems that there are some common threads, especially the focus on ethics and standards, and communicating the various forms of ‘value’ that museums and galleries contribute – cultural, creative, economic, amenity, social, educational etc.

At MA14, Auckland Museum presented research they have undertaken with Auckland Council to measure the Social Return On Investment (SROI) for the Moana – My Ocean exhibition. This paper has now been peer reviewed and published, showing a dollar value for SROI.  We expect to have videos of the MA14 keynote speakers, including Ganesh Nana’s exploration of economic and other ‘value’ on our website next week.

In Australia there has recently been publicity about dubious provenance of items acquired by museums. The National Gallery of Australia is embroiled in an international legal battle after it was found that an item it had bought from a New York based dealer Art of the Past was in fact stolen. It has subsequently come out that the NGA bought several million dollars worth of items from this dealer, as did other major museums internationally. A meeting of the four peak museum sector organisations in Australia has issued a joint statement on ethics in collecting to highlight the importance of due diligence and maintaining the highest possible ethical standards.

In China, the museum-building spree is running into problems with fakes. According to state media, 299 new establishments registered last year, but fakes are said to be rife in its antiques market. Police shut down the Lucheng museum, in the north-eastern province of Liaoning, after finding almost a third of the 8,000 items on display were not genuine. Counterfeits on show included a sword touted as dating from the Qing Dynasty and worth 120 million yuan (£11m), the report said.

The local news has been mixed, with the struggling Katikati Museum closing, and minimal damage from a potentially disastrous fire at Waikato Museum. Coincidentally, we had a fire evacuation drill at the MA office this week.  When did you last have a fire drill? Do you hold them regularly?

Kiwi North has secured $370k from Lotteries towards its $700k stage 2 development, Lopdell House is on track to open later this year as Te Uru Waitakere Contemporary Gallery, and in Ashburton locals have flocked to an open day to in the new museum and art gallery building ahead of fitout for opening later this year.

Curator Tryphena Cracknell at a floor talk for Momo Kauae: Moko Kauae in Contemporary Art

More good news stories include kuia featuring in exhibitions at Aratoi (Kuia: Kiri Riwai-Couch) and HCAG (Momo Kauae: Moko Kauae in Contemporary Art), the Sarjeant Gallery reopening in its temporary premises on Sarjeant on the Quay, and the new extension at Tairawhiti Museum has opened.

Creative New Zealand is consulting on a review of its support for visual and craft/object art, with responses due on Wednesday 25 June.  This is an important opportunity to have a say on the structure which affects how funding is distributed, and how.  A number of museum and gallery professionals took part int he focus groups whcih preceded the darfts reports which are now out for response. MA will be making a response, and we encourgae all who have an interest in Creative NZ’s craft/objecta dn visual art forms to read them and respond.  If you want to feed into MA’s response, please let us know by Friday 20 June.

And a reminder that ICOM New Zealand is calling for abstracts for the Pacific Connections conference in Auckland, 22-23 September 2014, which will focus on Pacific museum collections and research. Abstracts are due on 16 June 2014. Proposals for the 2014 National Digital Forum are also due on 16 June.

Ngā mihi,
Phillipa and Talei

News Update 26 May 2014

Kia ora

Over last weekend and International Museum Day, Phillipa and a small contingent of Kiwis were among around 400 delegates at Museums Australia’s conference in Launceston, Tasmania. While the weather was more like our West Coast, the welcome was warm and there were lots of inspiring and thought-provoking presentations as well as great social occasions.

After the conference, some of us headed to Hobart to visit MONA and the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery (TMAG). We enjoyed a tour of the award-winning redevelopment of TMAG with Acting Director Jennifer Storer, who many will have met at our MA14 conference. Tasmania has certainly changed in the 20+ years since my last visit. I can recommend both MONA and TMAG in Hobart, and QVMAG in Launceston, who were our generous conference hosts. They all offer a great museum experience, and have their own special characteristics and stories to share.

2014-05 TMAG tour w Jennifer Storer PT P1020052

The Tourism Industry Association has appointed a new CE after Martin Sneddon left to return to the world of cricket. Chris Roberts comes from Tourism New Zealand, and will continue the work of implementing and developing the new Tourism 2025 strategy.

And MBIE has released the International Visitor Survey for the year ended March 2014. The good news is that spending by international visitors in New Zealand has increased nine per cent on the previous year. US visitor spend is up by 55%, and visitors from China are also spending more. This correlates to the predicted shift in Chinese visitation from low-cost packages towards longer stay and higher spending individuals.

This week is Samoan Language week, check out the facebook page. If you want to make sure you know the dates for all the pacific language weeks go to this page for the full list for 2014.

If you are in need of some light diversion this week check out Otago Museum’s entry to #museumdanceoff. For more on what this is all about check out ‘When You Work At a Museum‘ .

Ngā mihi,
Phillipa and Talei

News & Notices – 8 May, 2014

Kia Ora,

Last week I was in Auckland for a workshop convened by Creative NZ as the first step in a review of the visual arts and craft/object artform categories. Around 30 people, including curators, directors, artists, educators and promoters, spent two days looking at what and how Creative NZ supports in craft/object and visual arts. We talked about how that fits into the wider ‘ecology’ of support for the arts, and what challenges, changes and priorities need to be considered over the next five years. CNZ staff will now distill all that discussion into draft reports which will be published online in early June. I encourage you to take the opportunity to provide feedback when the draft reports come out, as this will then inform the final reports and recommendations to the Arts Council in July.

While in Auckland I only managed to fit in one museum visit – to Auckland Art Gallery. I found My Country: Contemporary Art from Black Australia to be very interesting. I really enjoyed seeing the wide range of visitors to this touring exhibition from QAGOMA, including both children and adults having fun with Gordon Hookey’s Kangaroo Crew. This is an interactive for the 21st century, with hands-on activities as well as a series of retro-flavoured video game consoles, all based on a salutary tale of The Sacred Hill. There has been good media reporting and information coming out about the many other intriguing exhibitions and programmes around the country during the school holidays and around ANZAC weekend. I hope they were all as engaging and well-attended as My Country.

Also in Auckland, Lopdell House Gallery is rebranding. When the new gallery alongside the refurbished Lopdell House opens in the spring, it will be called Te Uru, or Te Hau a uru, referring to the west wind that ‘brings change, sets direction and influences the city of Auckland’.

Back in Wellington, the news is full of Mike Houlihan’s appointment as Special Adviser on Military Heritage at MCH. As Mike will not be returning to Te Papa, Arapata Hakiwai will take over as Acting CE while ‘an international search for a new Chief Executive is undertaken’.

One of our ongoing activities is research. This year’s National Visitor Survey is now complete, and participants can access their own and national data. We are preparing a visual similar to last year and it is interesting to see that the data is very similar. In June, a Victoria University museum studies student will be doing more research as a course placement. Lillian Bayly-McCredie will be looking into governance structures and how they impact on museums and galleries. Later in the year we will be reviewing and repeating the sector survey.

Statistics NZ is progressively releasing data from the 2013 census, such as Quickstats about culture and identity. As well as providing access to data tables for the serious analyst, they are producing really nice graphics which make it easy to understand. A new infographic on major ethnic groups shows 74% European, which is very close to the ethnicity of NZ-resident visitors in this year’s National Visitor Survey. Maori and Pacific Island visitor numbers however, are lower in our survey than the general population. On the 27th May another culture and identity module comes out which will be the first chance to access detailed ethnicity, birthplace, language, religion, and iwi data down to subnational levels. Check out who your potential local audience is and see how it matches up to your visitor data – who is coming and who is missing out? To find out how you can use this data, Statistics NZ is running a series of free public seminars around the country from late May to late June.

International Museums day is the 18th May with the theme ‘Museum Collections Make Connections’. MA will be sending out a press release to promote the sector and many museums around the country have special plans to mark the occasion. Our EMP group here in Wellington are even planning their first ‘Museum Hack’ tour to celebrate. Check out the ICOM webpage to find out what museums around the world are doing and the ICOM NZ webpage for a great list of ways your museum can get involved.

Ngā mihi,
Phillipa and Talei

News Update 12 November 2013

Kia ora,

When the MA Board met in October, we again discussed the need for a museums publication. We have not published Te Ara: journal of Museums Aotearoa since 2010. There have been a number of suggestions and discussions about ways in which this gap could be filled, and the Board is keen to see how these could be developed. We would like interested members to take part in this discussion, and have set up an online forum topic so we can canvass your ideas. Please join the discussion here.

Auckland Museum has published its 2012/2013 Annual Report as an e-book. AWMM reports, among other successes, that it is continuing its commitment to environmental responsibility: “energy costs were cut a further 19% and we remain on track in the coming months to slash carbon emissions over the past three years by 40%”. This is a great achievement and we congratulate AWMM on leading by example. Maybe we’ll find out how they do it in their  Draft Annual Plan 2014/2015, due for publication in the coming weeks. We are also planning more discussion of energy saving at the MA14 conference, The Business of Culture with a session on how to reduce costs and be environmentally responsible.

Lottery WW1, Environment & Heritage last week announced the latest round of grants for WW100 projects.  The media release from Ministers Finlayson and Tremain outlines 30 projects receiving at total of $2.7million, including a good number of museums and galleries. Community Matters The grants range from $2,000 upwards to $506,233 and $630,633 for Waikato Museum and the Navy Museum respectively.  In addition, Te Papa scored $3.6 million from the ‘National Significant Pool’ for its multi-media WW1 exhibition. Congratulations to all the successful museums and galleries – we look forward to seeing some really exciting and innovative WW1 projects.

Museum of Wellington's  1913 waterfront strike parade.

Museum of Wellington’s 1913 waterfront strike parade.

Other media coverage has been positive and varied, including Museum of Wellington’s re-enactment of the 1913 waterfront strike. With protesters and some suitably dressed ‘Massey’s Cossacks’ on horseback, they attracted TV One and 3News, as well as print articles.

This week we have the last of our regional forums – Wednesday at Puke Ariki and Thursday at Te Awamutu Museum.  We are really enjoying meeting up with folk around the country, and appreciate the feedback and ideas you are sharing with us and with each other.  There are some regions that have missed out because of time – and weather – and we’ll be scheduling those and more in 2014.

Back in the office we’ve just received the latest MAQ from the printer.  It will be going out in the post to you in the next few days. And we’re working hard on updating our Directory information.  If you haven’t yet done so, please check your details in the online Museums Directory and let Jeremiah know of any changes.

Ngā mihi
Phillipa and Talei

News Update 30 October 2013

Kia ora,

New Mayors and Councils are being sworn in around the country this week. There have been quite a few changes, and lots of local news stories about what both returning councillors and ‘new brooms’ are planning. We are in the process of developing an information pamphlet about New Zealand’s museums and galleries which we will be sending to all councils. We hope your council has changed for the better, and that you make the time to engage with them and to show your representatives the great work that you do.

Advocacy, networking, resourcing and information are some of the recurring topics in our current regional forums.  We are hearing really interesting ideas and discussions, and everyone who participates has told us how useful it is just to get together with colleagues from down the road. We appreciate your feedback on our activities as well as more general topics, and will be incorporating your ideas  into our planning or passing them on to others as appropriate.

 Tuatara curator Lindsay Hazley with just a few of SMAG's lively youngsters


Tuatara curator Lindsay Hazley with just a few of SMAG’s lively youngsters

Last week Talei and I were in Invercargill and Dunedin. Highlights included handling a tub of remarkably frisky young tuatara with curator Lindsay Hazley at Southland Museum and Art Gallery, visiting Te Hikoi in Riverton, and a chance to explore the wonderful Toitū Otago Settlers Museum, hosts for our Dunedin forum. There are some more photos on our Facebook page. I was also at the ICOM New Zealand conference and appreciated the presentations from Simon Knell of Leicester University and from three of our own recent museum studies graduates about their collections-based research.

This Friday Eric Dorfman and I will be at the opposite end of the country, hosted by the Northland Museums Association at Dargaville Museum. We’re looking forward to catching up with the folk up north.  Next up are Taranaki (New Plymouth) and Waikato (Te Awamutu) on 13 and 14 November. See our website for more details of regional meetings.

Back in the office we’ve contracted Jeremiah Boniface to work on checking our database and preparing the 2014 Directory. We have one more issue of MAQ coming out in the next couple of weeks, and an extra MA Board meeting in November as well.

By that time we’ll be racing towards the end of the year, with the National Digital Forum another major Wellington event.  NDF has a fantastic lineup of speakers and sessions at Te Papa on 26 and 27 November, and some other workshops and events before/after – it’s not too late to register.

If you’re in Wellington for NDF you could also support Arts Access Aotearoa, buy some art or other bargains – and possibly win a luxurious break away in Queenstown. The Awesome Arts Access Auction is on Wednesday 27 November, 6pm to 8pm at CQ Hotels Wellington, 223 Cuba St, Wellington. Tickets are only $25 and include live music from members of the Rodger Fox Wellington Jazz Orchestra, a drink on arrival (followed by great drink specials) and canapés. There will also be door prizes and excellent networking opportunities. Contact Gemma Williamson by email or call (04) 802 4349.

And we love to hear from our members, so if you can’t get to one of our meetings, or just want to chat, please give us a call on 04 499 1313 or send us an email.

Ngā mihi
Phillipa

News Update 15 October 2013

Kia ora

We’ve been out and about over the last few weeks, enjoying meeting up with many MA members and other colleagues at regional forums.  This week we’re looking forward to Whanganui on Wednesday and Wellington on Friday, when the MA Board also meets.  Next week we’ll be in Invercargill and Dunedin, including the ICOM New Zealand conference 25-26 October. See detailed listings below and please RSVP so we can set up rooms and catering.  If you can’t get to any of the meetings, we’re always happy to hear from you by telephone or email.
Last weekend over 30 Kaitiaki Maori gathered in Hawke’s Bay for the Titiro Whakamua hui. Despite some rain as people arrived on Friday, we were given a bright and cheerful welcome by the tangata whenua at Kohupatiki Marae near Clive, which has recently celebrated its centenary.
Tourism 2025 was launched at the recent Tourism Summit at Te Papa. This new tourism plan is being developed by TIANZ.
Its focus has five interelated themes:
  • Prioritise insight to drive and track progress – this is about using data and research to predict and evaluate initiatives and trend, and informs the next four areas
  • Grow sustainable air connectivity – find ways to get more international visitors here at attractive rates, grow emerging markets, and allow people to travel around the country easily
  • Target for value – understand key market segments and make sure our offerings are tailored to their needs
  • Drive value through outstanding visitor experience – remove barriers and ensure tourist satisfaction
  • Focus on productivity for profit – get the best value out of the resources we put into tourism products, eg by extending seasonality and availability
TIA CE Martin Snedden says this is only the beginning: “We are now focused on creating and obtaining industry endorsement for the actions that will bring Tourism 2025 to life. The actions we endorse must be pragmatic, affordable and valuable. We are not looking to create a huge list of actions that will stretch over 12 years. We recognise that we are operating in a fast-changing global and domestic tourism environment. The actions will have a short focus – one to three years – with scope for all tourism industry players, from the biggest corporates to SMEs, to play their part.”
Museums Aotearoa has provided information to the Tourism 2025 team, and will be making a further submission promoting the recognition of cultural tourism in this process.
Presentations from the Summit can be accessed on the TIA website.
Announcement of Simon Denny as NZ’s Venice Biennale artist for 2015
Announcement of NDF Board elections: new (and re-elected) NDF Board members:
  1. Matthew Oliver, from Manatu Taonga – Ministry for Culture and Heritage
  2. Mike Kmiec, from Victoria University of Wellington
  3. Jan Gow, from FamNet / Lets Research
  4. Leith Haarhoff, from Palmerston North City Library and Community Services
  5. Steven Fox, from Museum of Australian Democracy in Canberra
And we’re intrigued by a notice of an innovative event next week at the Museum of Wellington: the Do It Yourself Science Museum – a whole museum contained within a pizza box. This is an interactive and entertaining exploration of science and story, presented by Michele Fontana, a PhD student of Theatre and Museum Studies at Victoria University, who has won an Italian national acting contest. Two free shows only, on Wednesday 23 October. Bookings: 04 472 8904 or email.  We’ll be in Palmerston North that day, so if you go to this, please let us know how it goes!
Ngā mihi
Phillipa and Talei

News Update 1 October 2013

Kia ora,

MTG Hawke’s Bay opened with a flourish last week. Douglas Lloyd Jenkins declared his a one speech maximum for the Friday night party, which was attended by colleagues, artists and friends from around the country. It was was lots of fun, and a great way to celebrate the transformation of HBMAG into MTG Hawke’s Bay.
Hon Chris Finlayson enlists young assistants to cut MTG’s big blue ribbon

Hon Chris Finlayson enlists young assistants to cut MTG’s big blue ribbon

On Saturday morning it was time for formalities, with Mayors, Ministers, iwi and other dignitaries. The big blue ribbon was cut by Hon Chris Finlayson with help from some young friends, then everyone surged through the doors to see the brand new exhibitions. There was a carnival in the street to keep visitors and locals entertained – which was a good thing, as the queue waiting to get in stretched around the block. We congratulate the whole team who have worked to effect the transformation, and look forward to being there with you for the MA14 conference.
Saturday morning queues around the block

Saturday morning queues around the block

After Napier we traveled on to Auckland for a regional meeting at Auckland Museum. We had a lively and productive workshop with over 50 people from museums and galleries around Auckland. We’re really enjoying these gatherings, and seeing new and renewed networks in action. Next up is Nelson on 9 October – see our website for details on all our upcoming forums and to RSVP.
While in Auckland we visited three very different exhibitions. California Design is proving very popular at Auckland Art Gallery, and includes stylish video of mid-20th-century design production as well as beautiful design classics. We were intrigued by WIlliam Pope.L’s Long White Cloud at Te Tuhi, although we would have liked a bit more time to experience the post-performance installation. The Fashion Museum’s latest showing, Age of Aquarius, is attracting great publicity and media coverage, and has huge appeal to those of us who remember the ’70s – and its available to tour to other venues.
There have been some recent changes in public policy and accountability requirements.
New list of Protected Records for Local Authorities – which includes CCOs
Financial Reporting requirements announced for Registered Charities
Charities with annual expenditure of:
  • $1 million or more – financial statements must be audited by a qualified accountant
  • between $500,000 and $1 million – financial statements must be reviewed by a qualified accountant
  • less than $500,000 – can choose to have their financial statements reviewed or audited, or do neither
And a reminder of several events in coming weeks: regional forums, ICOM meeting in Dunedin, Simon Knell talks Wellington and Auckland
Ngā mihi
Phillipa and Talei

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