Posts Tagged 'NDF'

News Update 30 September 2014

Kia ora

Its great to see some really good news stories about museums and galleries recently in amongst the war, crime and election results making headlines. MOTAT was on Saturday’s TV One news as well as the Herald as it celebrates 50 years with new exhibits and a new strategy. And it seems that everyone loves a good slimy squid story – especially on video!

Young Theo experiments with Motat’s new ‘Welcome to the Machine’ exhibition. Photo / Mark Wardle

Last Friday the winner of the biennial Walters Prize was announced at Auckland Art Gallery – international judge Charles Esche was interviewed by Lyn Freeman on Radio NZ’s Standing Room Only, along with winning artist Luke Willis Thompson. Freeman also interviewed Simon Denny, Walters Prize finalist and artist selected to represent NZ at the 2016 Venice Biennale, whose show The Personal Effects of Kim Dotcom opens at the Adam Art Gallery this Friday.

The news was mixed for Museum of Wellington City and Sea, when they announced that the ‘key to the city’ of Wellington had been stolen from its display case - but the story turned out well when it was anonymously returned to Wellington Police. Also mixed exposure for Waitangi National Trust in the papers and TV3 drawing comments from PM John Key and local MP Kelvin Davis with the introduction of a $15 entry fee for New Zealanders after the fee was dropped in 2008.

On the down side, the Ashburton museum and gallery building is in the news again with its budget blowout and parking disputes between council and residents – another example of conflicting local interests getting in the way of what should be a positive community amentity.

And congratulations to Canterbury Museum, winner of the Tourism/Hospitality (medium/large enterprise) category at the 2014 Champion Canterbury Business Awards , just ahead of the Air Force Museum – Vbase partnership.

After serving for 32 years, Mike Taylor has retired from the staff and management committee of Picton Heritage & Whaling Museum.  The new Manager is Alison Hinkley, and the new President of Picton Historical Society is Jon Perano.  The Society reports they are in good heart and moving forward with new displays and looking forward to a busy cruise-ship season.TripAdvisor has named Te Papa best in the South Pacific, and Auckland Museum 2nd – ahead of all the Australian museums. Eight other New Zealand museums feature in the list, giving us 40% of the the top 25, with only 20% of Australia’s population and 15% of its GDP.

Last week saw about 40 people from a wide range of organisations meeting for ICOM NZ‘s conference at Auckland Museum, joined by a number of museum staff for many sessions. The theme of Pacific Connections: Culture, Connections, Museums and Research produced a varied and engaging 2-day programme.  The eye-opener for many was a sobering presentation about the reality of Pacific Islanders’ position in Auckland society by Damon Salesa, Associate Professor of Pacific Studies at The University of Auckland, and the first person of  Pacific Island descent to become a Rhodes scholar to Oxford. With humour and empathy, Damon explained the disengagement of Pasifika from mainstream economy, education and political power, and offered some insights into how some of these disadvantages and injustices might be addressed by museums. Thanks to hosts Auckland Museum, and the organisers, especially Jane Legget, for all the hard work that went into the conference.

Jonathan Mane-Wheoki and Roy Clare

Another highlight for those who stayed for the Museum Medals event at Auckland Museum on 23 September was the presentation of awards to some special colleagues. Linda Tyler and Margaret Morley were made Associate Emerita of the Auckland War Memorial Museum. Jonathan Mane-Wheoki and Dame Cheryll Sotheran were made a Companion of the Auckland War Memorial Museum, which recognises achievement or contribution to areas relevant to, or in some way connected to, the public service of Auckland Museum or other New Zealand museums. We applaud their well-deserved recognition.

Attending the ICOM conference and staying on to visit Wellington was Professor Dr Hans-Martin Hinz, President of ICOM international. His conference keynote explained the background of Germany’s colonial activity in the Pacific and its end because of WW1. Dr Hinz also gave a well-attended presentation about cultural objects at risk, hosted by NSTP at Te Papa last week.

We’re looking forward to seeing many of you at our regional meetings in the next two months, with the first at Waitomo tomorrow.  We’re also excited by the lineup of speakers for this year’s National Digital Forum conference, 25-26 November at Te Papa. You have until 5pm today (30 September) to apply for a registration bursary from MA.

If you’re in Wellington next Wednesday, 8 October, we recommend the Awesome Arts Access Auction. This is both fun and a terrific cause, we hope to see many friends and supporters there.

Mauriora,
Nā Phillipa māua ko Talei

News Update 15 October 2013

Kia ora

We’ve been out and about over the last few weeks, enjoying meeting up with many MA members and other colleagues at regional forums.  This week we’re looking forward to Whanganui on Wednesday and Wellington on Friday, when the MA Board also meets.  Next week we’ll be in Invercargill and Dunedin, including the ICOM New Zealand conference 25-26 October. See detailed listings below and please RSVP so we can set up rooms and catering.  If you can’t get to any of the meetings, we’re always happy to hear from you by telephone or email.
Last weekend over 30 Kaitiaki Maori gathered in Hawke’s Bay for the Titiro Whakamua hui. Despite some rain as people arrived on Friday, we were given a bright and cheerful welcome by the tangata whenua at Kohupatiki Marae near Clive, which has recently celebrated its centenary.
Tourism 2025 was launched at the recent Tourism Summit at Te Papa. This new tourism plan is being developed by TIANZ.
Its focus has five interelated themes:
  • Prioritise insight to drive and track progress – this is about using data and research to predict and evaluate initiatives and trend, and informs the next four areas
  • Grow sustainable air connectivity – find ways to get more international visitors here at attractive rates, grow emerging markets, and allow people to travel around the country easily
  • Target for value – understand key market segments and make sure our offerings are tailored to their needs
  • Drive value through outstanding visitor experience – remove barriers and ensure tourist satisfaction
  • Focus on productivity for profit – get the best value out of the resources we put into tourism products, eg by extending seasonality and availability
TIA CE Martin Snedden says this is only the beginning: “We are now focused on creating and obtaining industry endorsement for the actions that will bring Tourism 2025 to life. The actions we endorse must be pragmatic, affordable and valuable. We are not looking to create a huge list of actions that will stretch over 12 years. We recognise that we are operating in a fast-changing global and domestic tourism environment. The actions will have a short focus – one to three years – with scope for all tourism industry players, from the biggest corporates to SMEs, to play their part.”
Museums Aotearoa has provided information to the Tourism 2025 team, and will be making a further submission promoting the recognition of cultural tourism in this process.
Presentations from the Summit can be accessed on the TIA website.
Announcement of Simon Denny as NZ’s Venice Biennale artist for 2015
Announcement of NDF Board elections: new (and re-elected) NDF Board members:
  1. Matthew Oliver, from Manatu Taonga – Ministry for Culture and Heritage
  2. Mike Kmiec, from Victoria University of Wellington
  3. Jan Gow, from FamNet / Lets Research
  4. Leith Haarhoff, from Palmerston North City Library and Community Services
  5. Steven Fox, from Museum of Australian Democracy in Canberra
And we’re intrigued by a notice of an innovative event next week at the Museum of Wellington: the Do It Yourself Science Museum – a whole museum contained within a pizza box. This is an interactive and entertaining exploration of science and story, presented by Michele Fontana, a PhD student of Theatre and Museum Studies at Victoria University, who has won an Italian national acting contest. Two free shows only, on Wednesday 23 October. Bookings: 04 472 8904 or email.  We’ll be in Palmerston North that day, so if you go to this, please let us know how it goes!
Ngā mihi
Phillipa and Talei

News Update 10 September 2013

Kia ora,

Just in case you missed the weekend headline news, Te Papa is planning to work with Auckland Council and other Auckland institutions to develop a new centre in Manukau. You can read the government press release here. Te Papa advise that the next step is to work with MCH on a business case, which they expect to present to government in November. They will also “develop a plan to consult with stakeholders over the coming months. This is likely to have several layers or phases, as the project planning takes shape.”  We look forward to the sector being involved, and to exploring the potential of this bold collaborative proposal.

Last Friday around 70 ‘GLAMorous’ folk from around the country gathered in Wellington to discuss the future.  Actually, the standard of dress wasn’t the topic – it was the history and future of collaborations across and between Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums. The scene was set by Eric Ketelaar, Emeritus Professor of Archivistics at the University of Amsterdam, who discussed perspectives on collecting and making meaning of collected objects. He sees both similarities and differences in the various GLAM perspectives, which mediate meaning for the user in their own ways. Other speakers included:

  • Conal McCarthy, VUW – ‘practice theory’
  • Chris Szekely, Alexander Turnbull Library – ATL’s role as archive, library and exhibitor of mātauranga Māori, and the possibilities of a ‘GLAMāorious’ future
  • Rebecca Rice, Te Papa – historical fluidity and competitive collecting between national institutions
  • Brenda Chawner, VUW and Katherine Howard, QUT – shifts in focus from librarianship to information management, the development of core curriculum, and convergence in education for GLAM professionals
  • Shannon Wellington (VUW), Virginia Gow (MCH) and Mark Crookston (ATL) – discussion on building GLAMour through built, digital and organisational infrastructure

The day ended with a lively panel discussion in which National Librarian Bill Macnaught, Chief Archivist Greg Goulding, museum consultant Ken Gorbey and Eric Ketelaar agreed that each different strand of GLAM has something to contribute, while not going quite as far as merging. It seems that ‘convergence’ may not be as useful a concept as ‘synergy’ and ‘harmonisation’.

Memorial Museum Passchendaele 1917

Memorial Museum Passchendaele 1917

According to Scoop, New Zealand will host 121 cruises in the 2013-14 season. Cruise NZ forecasts the season will generate $311 million and account for 5361 jobs. Their website has information on what ships will be where – we hope that the cruisers will enjoy visiting our museums and galleries.

As a follow up to Andrew Matheson’s post about his tour of the ‘Western Front’, he has a request from Memorial Museum Passchendaele 1917:
New Zealand friends in Belgium
In a recent guest blog I gave a brief introduction to four First World War museums on the ‘Western Front’, two in France and two in Belgium.  They’re all aware of the service and sacrifice of New Zealanders in their localities in that war, but none more so that the Memorial Museum Passchendaele 1917.  The museum is planning to take a travelling exhibition to Canada, Australia and New Zealand in 2015, 2016 and 2017 and is after help in two areas — provision of New Zealand content for the exhibition, and supporting/hosting the travelling exhibition in 2017.  If you’re interested, please contact the chairman of the Passchendaele 1917 society, Freddy Declerk.
Andrew Matheson, Director, First World War Centenary programme
The Emerging Professions group (EMPs) has been rapidly growing and various regions have been organising meet-ups. The Christchurch group is meeting 5.30pm, Wednesday 11 September at CBD Bar (http://www.cbdbar.co.nz/), 208 Madras Street and the Wellington group will be meeting Thursday 26 September – 6pm at The Library on Courtenay Place. Feel free to come along if you identify as an ‘emerging museum professional’ or email Michelle Sim if you would like to know more about the group MICHELLE.SIM@nzdf.mil.nz.There are many useful and interesting events coming up before the end of this year. We hope to talk to many of you at MA’s regional meetings – your opportunity to meet colleagues as well as MA staff and Board members and have your say in our activities. There will also be the first conference for ICOM New Zealand members in Dunedin, a Talkfest at Objectspace, Tītiro Whakamua Kaitiaki hui in Hawke’s Bay, and Middle Earth Curators’ Hui in Palmerston North. See these and other happenings listed below.And the NDF 2013 conference is less than 3 months away, just before the pre-Christmas rush.  NDF is always inspirational as well as fun. This year MA offered to sponsor the mini-programme to help the conference budget.  However, that was already ‘sold’ so we have ended up sponsoring icecream – come along and enjoy!

Ngā mihi
Phillipa and Talei
PS – a reminder that we want your to hear ideas for MA14. Please send them to us by 23 September, just after the re-opening weekend of hosts MTG Hawke’s Bay – they’ll be looking for something new to work on!

News Update 27 November, 2012

Kia ora,

Those of you lucky enough to hear and meet Bert Crenca at the MA12 conference will recall his enthusiasm, and the dynamic youth programmes he founded at AS220 at Rhode Island. Last week First Lady Michelle Obama presented AS220 Youth with a National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award. One of fifty finalists, chosen from a pool of 350 applicants, and one of only twelve organizations to win. We’re sending a big shout out to AS220 Youth!

In the news: Capital E – the latest member to have their building closed due to earthquake risk – have found a temporary home at the Railway Social Hall on Waterloo Quay. They have hired space to run their programmes, OnTV and Sound House. Toitū Otago Settlers Museum is gearing up for their big re-opening on Dec 8th. Auckland Museums helped to solve the mystery of the dissappearing island. And the National Library is now fully open with ‘Te Ahumairangi’ – their new visitor space. ‘Te Ahumairangi’ is an exciting reconception of the traditional library space. We loved this idea for the Christchurch Cathedral now that demolition has been halted (thanks Christchurch Art Gallery).

There has also been more news of restructuring and staff moving around the country. Helen Kedgley has been appointed to the new position of Director at Pataka, and Fiona Emberton has left Puke Ariki. All this leads to more job opportunities – check out the latest on our Vacancies Page.

National Digital Forum was packed. Two days of presentations about how the culture and heritage sector are using the huge potential of digital technologies. Speakers included Piotr Adamczyk who talked about his experience at the Google Art Project; Catherine Styles showed us how National Museum of Australia’s game of associative thinking ‘Sembl’ can generate new engagement; Courtney Johnson talked about her idea for making an art collection categorised by emotion; and Suze Cairns asked ‘Are we remaking the museum in the image of the internet?’ A theme that was repeated by the speakers, both local and international, was the need for institutions to take a fresh look at their purpose. Museums are becoming less of a repository of objects and more of a generator of knowledge and stories. Day to day use of technologies is changing public expectations around access and expertise, and dissolving traditional boundaries between the institution and the outside world. All the speakers advocated for the ‘open museum’, for experimentation, risk, open access to collections and information and to actively seek out and give equal voice to their audiences.

Last week the Ministry of Business, Innovation & Employment released the latest tourism forcasts, 2012-2018. These are positive, predicting a nine percent growth in visitor spending (to $6.3 billion) and 28 percent rise in visitor numbers (to 3.3 million) by December 2018. Also predicted was a continuing decline in traditional markets such as the UK and US, off-set by strong growth from China and Australia. If this shift comes about, it will have implications for museums, as the Australian and Asian visitors make shorter trips. Read the full details here.

MA13: Hamilton, 10-12 April 2013

Thank you to everyone who has come up with ideas and suggestions for the MA13 conference. We have some really good speakers and topics lined up, and hope to squeeze in a few more yet. MA13 will start off with the second Museums Aotearoa Lecture on the evening of Wednesday 10 April, then two full days of conference, including the NZ Museum Awards dinner on Thursday 11 April, and some local tours. Early Bird registrations will open in December.

Phillipa is in Sydney this week at INTERCOM 2012, the conference of the ICOM International Committee on Museum Management, where she is giving a paper on Wednesday. The theme is #museumchallenges – which is also a Twitter hashtag. Even if you aren’t on Twitter, you can look up the conference tweets and see comments and links from and about the conference. There are delegates from over 25 countries, making it a truly international sharing of ideas and opportunities. While the challenges being shared are pretty tough – budget cuts, social change, stakeholder pressure etc – there is a really positive attitude towards the opportunities that museums need to embrace to ensure relevance and an ongoing place in society. We’ll share the experience with you in the next MAQ.

Nga mihi,
Phillipa & Talei

News Update 8 December 2011

The news is mixed this week, and mostly positive, although many organisations are looking at a fairly tough local government climate ahead. You can read or download the latest news round-up here in our members’ area.

Last week Sophie and I were immersed in the NDF conference. It was inspiring and intriguing, and Sophie blogged about it yesterday, here. I also went to the second WW1 planning meeting, and a symposium convened by the Archives and Records Association of New Zealand (ARANZ) which focussed on some of the challenges and lessons for the archive community arising from the Canterbury earthquakes. We will be bringing you more information on both of these important topics through further notices, publications and meetings. If you are interested in more details now, please contact us.

We also watched the election results with interest. With National back leading the government, we now await the announcement of cabinet portfolios, with the vital arts, culture and heritage position open to speculation. Chris Finlayson has been a very supportive minister, and his skills may be in demand in other areas this term. There may also be re-allocation of other portfolios relevant to the museum sector, such as tourism and internal affairs. And in the opposition ranks, we farewell opposition arts spokesperson Steve Chadwick, acknowledge her strong support and wish her well.

Domestic tourism up
The latest Tourism data shows domestic tourism has increased over the last year. The Domestic Travel Survey for the year ended September shows Overnight Trips up 4.1%, Day Trips up 14.6% and Expenditure up 10.7% on the previous year. At $9.4 billion, this is an enormous contribution to our economy. The data is good news for the museum sector, although not surprising when you think about the drop in international tourism – presumably NZers are not travelling overseas as much either, and are instead taking holidays within our own country. Full details are available from Tourism Research

MA12 conference, scholarships and awards
Here in Wellington we’re working very actively on planning for the MA12 conference – Collaboration in Practice. Look out for announcents of keynote speakers and programme information in the next week. We will also be opening applications for The Clark Colelction / Creative New Zealand Scholarship, the Mina McKenzie Scholarship, and the 2012 New Zealand Museum Awards. Watch this space…

Ka kite,
Phillipa

National Digital Forum Reflections (National Horseless Forum?)

Phillipa and I attended the National Digital Forum (NDF) conference last week. Phillipa is on the NDF Board, which is great for Museums Aotearoa, because it keeps us in the loop with one of the few organisations spanning the entire NZ ‘GLAM sector’ (Galleries, Libraries, Archives & Museums). New Zealand is pretty small, and it seems we’re all sitting in our respective cultural/memory/identity institutions thinking about similar challenges. We should be talking to each other as much as possible. So that’s what we did last week, and here are a few thoughts I had…

It was my second NDF conference, and I’m happy to report it was every bit as interesting as my first. Last year I was initially bemused at the concept of attending a ‘cross sector digital conference’. How frightening. I’ve only just mastered the microwave. Needless to say, I donned my best imposter stance and got on with it. I was pleasantly surprised then, as I was last week, with the relevant content discussed.

NDF is not a conference of tech people talking in inaccessible languages about the latest widgety wizardry thing they have created. Well, I suppose there’s a little bit of that, but it’s also very much a forum of thought provoking questions, challenges, calls to action, and actual constructive discussions about the future of our work. In a rapidly changing ‘digital environment’. Otherwise known as the modern world.

There was a lot of information thrown around over two days, and different people will be taking away different ideas to apply to their work. From my perspective, a week later, I have a few comments stuck in my mind that I’d like to share.

The first is from Michael Lascarides, of New York Public Library fame. He kicked off the conference talking about some projects they’re currently working on. Including What’s on the menu?, a crowdsourced menu transcription project, and their very fun Map Warper tool, which locates historical maps onto their current location/current maps, and also works on the principle of public participation. They’re fantastic projects, well worth checking out.

Within this presentation, Michael made the comment that “digital is the new horseless”. In other words, to define anything as digital is becoming increasingly redundant, because all we’re doing is making a statement about what it is not. (Incidentally this is a thought which occurs to me when I select the ever mysterious ‘vegetarian option’ at weddings. I don’t know what it is, but I do know what it’s not). So in this case, we’re making an arbitrary distinction between the physical and the non-physical. I think this is an important point, and one that we need to be constantly reminding ourselves about. Quit thinking about fancy digital experiences/content. Just focus on authentic experiences/content. Understand that people expect the technology of the day to be part of everything that they do, and the technology that enables our work always has been, and always will be changing.

The second related (throwaway) comment that I liked was made by Michael Parry from the Australian Centre for the Moving Image, in Melbourne. They’ve been doing some cool things, such as their 15 Second Place project. The idea is that people capture ‘the mood of the place they’re in’, in a 15 second video, and upload it to an ACMI site via iPhone app. Apparently the app also works on iPod touch and iPad, and you can view the site (but not upload content) on other mobile devices. It’s an experience made for iPhone users. People are using it, having fun, telling their stories.

Someone asked Michael about ACMI’s decision to design for iPhone, and Michael made a quip along the lines of ‘Have you ever seen someone taking a video on an iPad? Yeah, they look like a dick’. Which I thought was wonderful. That’s a joke, obviously (although I did see someone taking a photo outside Te Papa with an iPad yesterday, and would have to agree…) but what I liked was the attitude of not over-thinking the creation of a thing/experience/interaction. Do what is logical. Focus on your audience. Don’t try and do everything, just do something well. Make things. If they’re wrong, change them.

The third fond moment worth sharing was actually from a slide in Lucinda Blaser’s presentation. Lucinda is from the National Maritime Museum in London. Her presentation was all about getting data out there. The attitudinal shift from making sure all information presented to the public is curated, complete and accurate, to simply making all data available. Knowing that in some cases it will be wrong, and allowing the public to play a part in the collection/modification of the information we hold.

What tickled me during Lucinda’s presentation was a selection of quotes that I believe had been transcribed from a ship’s log. One of these gems was simply “course diverted to investigate whales”. I liked this, firstly because it made a nice interlude to imagine a ship full of ye olde English sailors gallivanting around the oceans ‘investigating’ whales, and secondly because I thought it nicely illustrated the human connection to the content that we talk about. We can not know how people (now or in the future) will use the content that we have, what they will take from it, what it will mean to them, and it doesn’t matter. What we do know is that people probably won’t find any of it unless we make it accessible, put it out there, share our things/stories/connections. Do this well, and we can sit back and let people make their own emotional connections.

That’s my two cents worth.

As a vaguely related endnote, I want to let you know that the Wellington City Council last month ‘launched’ the 1892 Thomas Ward maps of central Wellington as an additional layer you can select to view in their public GIS system (which shows other useful information like drainage layers, and property boundaries etc). Here’s a press release from the Mayor getting excited about said ‘Geospatial Goldmine’. It’s a small step, but it’s in the right direction. There’s a lot more gold just waiting to be exploited in that mine. And there’s a big role for us (and by us I mean GLAMs) all to play in that ‘mining expedition’, so to speak.

We need to be thinking about getting out of our bunkers and talking to each other, working together even. Illustrating the potential of our information! How it can enrich lives! Taking it to the people!

Incidentally, our next conference is in April – in Wellington. The theme is collaboration.

Come.

Talk to your colleagues.

Sophie de Lautour Kelly – MA Membership Services Manager

News Update 9 November 2011

The latest news is full of post-rugby events/analysis, a few interesting debates, and election build-up. You can read or download the round-up here in our members’ area

New developments
After the rush to get everything ready for the Rugby World Cup, there are some catch-ups and new developments still under way. This week MOTAT officially opened its new Aviation Display Hall, complete with Skyhawk. As well as the various architecture and building awards it has already received, the transformation was highly praised by the Mayor of Auckland, Len Brown, and Defence Minister Hon Wayne Mapp at a function very well-attended by supporters, volunteers and other contributors to the project.

There are still more museum developments underway. In Napier, the Hawke’s Bay Museum & Art Gallery boasts a very large hole in the ground. Dunedin’s Otago Settlers Museum is still under construction, and Kaitaia’s Te Ahu complex is nearly complete, and is holding an open evening for local communities today. Several of these websites include time lapse video and/or webcams, and the Auckland Art Gallery has theirs on YouTube here.

In the wings are several more developments, including the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, Air Force Museum, South Canterbury Museum and The Suter, with Canterbury Museum also hoping to get its development back on track soon….

New technology
We are all more environmentally conscious than ever, minimising waste not just to save the planet, but to save our pennies as well. In what I think is a first for museums in this country, Auckland War Memorial Museum has released its 2010-2011 Annual Report as an eBook, complete with on-screen navigation and zoom. They have also catered for those who prefer to print it out as a pdf – you can find both on the AWMM website.  To keep in touch with the latest digital developments for GLAMS, I’ll see you at the National Digital Forum conference in Wellington, 29-30 November.

New NDF Board
Results of the National Digital Forum Board election have just been announced – welcome to Steven Fox, Director of Te Manawa, and Matthew Oliver, Web Team Manager at the Ministry for Culture & Heritage.  They are joined by returning Board members Andy Fenton (NZ Micrographic Services/ARANZ) and Anne Scott (University of Canterbury Library).  Full details on the NDF website.

New policies
Well maybe not new, but the major parties have launched their arts, culture and heritage election policies. Neither are likely to grab public attention like asset sales or raising the superannuation age, but at least some of us care. You can download the National and Labour documents and make your own mind up over the next 2 1/2 weeks.  Other parties have also published policies which may at some point have some influence, including Green, Maori and United Future.

New staff
You may have noticed that we advertised two part time/fixed term positions at MA recently. Sophie and I will be joined in November and December by Cerys Dallaway, who will help us prepare the 2012 edition of the MA Directory. All museums and galleries will be hearing from Cerys over the next few weeks to check we have up to date information. And we will also be engaging Rebecca Apperley to be the MA12 conference coordinator on a part time basis.

Ka kite,
Phillipa

PS – we hope to see many of you at the members’ forum in Christchurch on 24 November – all members and staff of member institutions are welcome.



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