Archive for July, 2012

Jim Marchbank – Keynote address at MA12

19 April 2012

Jim Marchbank held senior management positions at Science North in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, starting in 1982 as Director of Development. He became Chief Executive Officer of Science North in 1987 and served in that capacity for 24 years before stepping down in May 2011. Under his direction Science North grew to be the largest tourist attraction in Northern Ontario, encompassing an internationally recognized science centre, a Special Exhibits Hall, a the F. Jean MacLeod Butterfly Gallery, a 2D/3D IMAX Theatre, and a digital dome planetarium. A separate earth sciences centre, Dynamic Earth, opened in spring 2003 and then went through two expansions with the most recent addition opening in 2009. In March 2011 Science North reopened after a short closure with the most substantial capital renewal of visitor experiences the science centre had undergone since opening in 1984. Science North is Canada’s 2nd largest science centre located in Canada’s 23rd largest metropolitan area.

Jim Marchbank – Former CEO, Science North part 1 from Museums Aotearoa on Vimeo.

Jim Marchbank – Former CEO, Science North part 2 from Museums Aotearoa on Vimeo.

Jim Marchbank – Former CEO, Science North part 3 from Museums Aotearoa on Vimeo.

Jim Marchbank held senior management positions at Science North in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, starting in 1982 as Director of Development. He became Chief Executive Officer of Science North in 1987 and served in that capacity for 24 years before stepping down in May 2011. Under his direction Science North grew to be the largest tourist attraction in Northern Ontario, encompassing an internationally recognized science centre, a Special Exhibits Hall, a the F. Jean MacLeod Butterfly Gallery, a 2D/3D IMAX Theatre, and a digital dome planetarium. A separate earth sciences centre, Dynamic Earth, opened in spring 2003 and then went through two expansions with the most recent addition opening in 2009. In March 2011 Science North reopened after a short closure with the most substantial capital renewal of visitor experiences the science centre had undergone since opening in 1984. Science North is Canada’s 2nd largest science centre located in Canada’s 23rd largest metropolitan area.

Jim Marchbank was President of the international Giant Screen Theater Association (GSTA), an association representing educational large-format or IMAX theatres, in 1999-2000. He was a member of the Board of the Association of Science and Technology Centers from 1993 to 1999, and served as a member of the Organizing Committee for the 2008 World Congress of Science Centres. He was the first President of the Canadian Association of Science Centres (CASC).

Mr. Marchbank was executive producer of a large format film, Gold Fever produced by Science North and released June 1999. It was funded largely by gold mining companies. He was co-executive producer of the large format film Jane Goodall’s Wild Chimpanzees released in May 2002. It was a collaboration of three science centres with corporate and American government funding. He was Executive Producer of Wings Over the North: A 4D Bush Plane Adventure, a $2 million productionreleased in June 2004, a collaboration with a small aviation museum. Mr. Marchbank was the Executive Producer for Mysteries of the Great Lakes, a large format film directed, produced and distributed by Science North and released May 2008.

As CEO of Science North Mr. Marchbank helped develop North America’s only science centre-university joint post-graduate program in science communication with Sudbury’s Laurentian University. The program has now graduated over 60 students with post graduate Diplomas in Science Communication who are working in science communication roles around the world.

Science North added a large external sales unit under Mr. Marchbank’s leadership. This unit sold exhibits, programs and services to science centres, government agencies and corporations around the world earning resources which were invested at home in Science North. The unit led Science North into partnerships with others that helped create major travelling exhibits for Science North which have toured North America and been enjoyed by millions of science centre and museum visitors.

In March 1993, Jim was awarded the Commemorative Medal for the 125th anniversary of Canadian Confederation. He was named one of 50 Distinguished Graduates recognized by Laurentian University on its 50th Anniversary in 2011. He is the recipient of an Honorourary Degree from Thorneloe University in Sudbury and a Lifetime Achievement Award of the Canadian Association of Science Centres. Upon stepping down as CEO of Science North he was made an Honourary Life Member, the centre’s highest recognition.

News & Notices, 24 July 2012

Kia ora,This week is Maori Language Week – Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori. The theme this year is ‘Arohatia te Reo’ – ‘to cherish the language’. While a few National Radio listeners may still complain about being greeted in te reo, it is great to hear at least a few words becoming part of our everyday lives. There is much that museums and galleries can do to encourage and reinforce the use of Māori language, and many museums around the country putting in a special effort. Some examples that have attracted our attention are City Gallery in Wellington which is having an evening of te reo Māori debates; Puke Ariki, in collaboration with Te Reo O Taranaki, have put together a great programme of events to celebrate Taranaki’s unique reo and Te Papa has produced some YouTube videos where staff and Kaumātua (elders) talk about their favourite Māori word and what makes these words special to them.

Local news is still simmering with council planning decisions. Budgets are tight everywhere. Whanganui District Council has postponed making decisions on redevelopment and/or strengthening of the Sarjeant Gallery, and in Whangarei, opponents and supporters of the proposed Hundertwasser Art Centre have taken to Facebook to air their views. On one hand, public debate has a vital role in council decision-making. On the other, councils need to take a more strategic approach than individuals, and make informed decisions on behalf of their communities, not just respond to whoever’s voice is loudest. Central government wants to make local councils more effective, efficient and transparent, as outlined in Better Local Government (March 2012), and in various other local government reform activities.

A Bill to amend the Local Government Act 2002 is currently going through parliament, with submissions due this week. Among other things, this Bill will change the purpose of local councils, removing the ‘four well-beings’. It also makes provision for council amalgamations, government intervention and specific ‘fiscal responsibility’ requirements. It has been argued that the new purpose clause is unclear and is likely to make council decisions more open to challenge through the legal process rather than the democratic process. It has also been argued that the aim of reining in council spending is based on an erroneous assumption that increased council expenditure is the result of expanding activities, when it has already been shown that the primary causes are increased compliance and infrastructure costs – the core activities on which central government requires councils to focus.

The UKMuseums Journal reports that the Heritage Lotteries Fund – which distributes 375 million pounds in grants annually – has made access to digital content a precondition of funding for all of its projects. This is being applied across the board to all projects, and access must be free for non-commercial use. See this and other UK stories on the Museums Association website.

Te Hono ki Aotearoa in Leiden

We are intrigued by Jan Bieringa’s film Te Hono ki Aotearoa, which follows the commissioning, making and handover of a waka on permanent loan to the Museum Volkenkunde in Leiden. This film is ideal for museums and their audiences, exploring new ways of thinking about collections and partnerships. It has been shown at Pataka, and Jan will make it available to museums around the country.

And we hope to see many MA members and colleagues at the museum and galleries session which is being held during the Diversity Forum in Auckland on 20 August.

Nga mihi o te Wiki o te Reo Māori ,
Phillipa & Talei

MA12 Panel Discussion – Whakakotahitanga – working together

Panel Discussion – Wednesday 18th April, 2012

Whakakotahitanga – working together

Chair – Darcy Nicholas

Haami Piripi and Phil Cross: Creating Te Ahu, reflecting the cultures of 7 iwi

Wayne Ngata: Maori and Science converging for the Transit of Venus

Whakakotahitanga – working together 1 from Museums Aotearoa on Vimeo.

Whakakotahitanga – working together 2 from Museums Aotearoa on Vimeo.

Whakakotahitanga – working together 3 from Museums Aotearoa on Vimeo.

Mike Hollings keynote address at MA12

Wednesday 18 April 2012, 10.30am-11.30am at Soundings Theatre, Te Papa

Mike Hollings (Ngāti Raukawa) has more than 30 years wide-ranging experience in the education sector, from teaching through to management, policy development, and review. For the past five years he has been the Chief Executive of Te Kura (The Correspondence School of New Zealand). Prior to joining Te Kura, Mike was the National Manager Analysis and Policy at the Education Review Office with responsibility for evaluating the quality of education in New Zealand schools and was the acting Chief Executive between June 2005 and May 2006. He was the Chief Executive of Te Mangai Paho, the Māori Broadcasting Funding Agency from 1996 to 1999 and has held various senior management positions at Te Puni Kōkiri, The Ministry of Māori Development.

In his home community, Mike has led the establishment of Te Kōhanga Reo (early childhood Māori language immersion educatino) and Kura Kaupapa Māori (Māori language immersion education in primary and secondary schooling).

Mike Hollings, Chief Executive, Te Kura, The Correspondence School of New Zealand Part 1 from Museums Aotearoa on Vimeo.

Mike Hollings, Chief Executive, Te Kura, The Correspondence School of New Zealand Part 2 from Museums Aotearoa on Vimeo.

News Update 10 July 2012

Kia ora,

The last fortnight has seen more council planning and funding decisions reported, and more controversies. When resources are tight, there will always be some who see museums and galleries as soft targets for cuts – and unfortunately such decisions are often made in ignorance of – or in spite of – the consequences.

In Ashburton, objectors to the new museum/gallery project are staging a mini-version of the Auckland Art Gallery controversy, invoking the RMA and Environment Court. While the scale is rather different, the delay and wrangling will inevitably be costly in time, energy and dollars. Invercargill is also gripped with frustration over development plans for Southland Museum & Art Gallery, now calling for a ‘review’ of their proposed $24.6m project. In Auckland the final outcome has been even better than anticipated, and the Auckland Art Gallery has now carried off yet another prestigious architecture award, claiming one of the 12 international awards from the Royal Institute of British Architects. We can only hope that Ashburton and Invercargill come out of it all with great new facilities.

Further north, Marcus Boroughs is leaving Aratoi to be head of Public Programmes at Auckland Museum in the midst of very public stone-throwing at governance level, and now their Board Chair has stepped down as well. In Wellington the Museums Trust is under fire from its Maritime Friends for the Museum of Wellington deaccessioning a model of the Titanic. And announcements are finally being made of Te Papa’s new vision and structure.

The National Whale Centre has launched their Virtual Museumand blog this month. The creation of the National Whale Centre is the result of many years of research into the creation of a Picton Foreshore attraction which addresses the unique position of New Zealand as an ocean nation with a 172 plus years history of whaling and subsequent shift to more sustainable aquamarine industries and associated ecotourism ventures. You can see their site and blog here.

Statistics survey development
Accurate and detailed information is essential for planning and for advocacy. We have already mentioned that Museums Aotearoa is developing a comprehensive sector statistics project to gather and share data about museums and galleries around the country. This is taking shape now, and we expect to roll it out in August.

Staff moves
With the latest announcement that Cam McCracken will be taking over as Director of the Dunedin Public Art Gallery, and Marcus Boroughs departure from Aratoi, there are some interesting vacancies around the country. Alongside changes proposed at Te Papa and underway in other institutions, and a record number of vacancy advertisements coming through in the last few weeks, we are clearly in a period of ‘churn’. So for museum professionals looking to advance your career, now is the time to consider your options and look at taking on a new challenge.

Nga mihi,
Phillipa & Talei

Jock Phillips – Was This Real New Zealand? TelstraClear Museums Aotearoa Lecture

The inaugural TelstraClear Museums Aotearoa Lecture was held Tuesday 17 April 2012, 6.30pm-7.30pm at Soundings Theatre, Te Papa.

Was this Real New Zealand?

Jock Phillips looks at the ways in which our history and identity is approached and presented, drawing on his Rugby World Cup Real New Zealand Festival road trip and his experience of the national museum (Te Papa) and the National Encyclopedia (Te Ara).  How do we exhibit our history, what makes a museum exhibition work, and what did the ‘Real New Zealand’ festival say about the state of our culture?

Jock Phillips is Senior Editor of Te Ara, the Online Encyclopedia of New Zealand in the Ministry for Culture and Heritage. He was previously New Zealand’s Chief Historian following 16 years teaching American and New Zealand History at Victoria University of Wellington.  He was also the founding Director of the Stout Research Centre for the study of New Zealand society, history and culture; and was the Conceptual Leader for the History exhibitions at Te Papa, Museum of New Zealand.

He has published thirteen books on New Zealand history, of which the best known is A Man’s Country: The image of the Pakeha male – a history.  His latest book, Settlers (with Terry Hearn) covers the history of British immigration to New Zealand.

Telstra Clear Ltd has joined with Museums Aotearoa in the spirit of collaboration to launch the Museums Aotearoa Lecture.

Jock Philips – Was This Real New Zealand Part 1 from Museums Aotearoa on Vimeo.

Jock Philips – Was This Real New Zealand Part 2 from Museums Aotearoa on Vimeo.


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