Posts Tagged 'Capital E'

News Update 27 November, 2012

Kia ora,

Those of you lucky enough to hear and meet Bert Crenca at the MA12 conference will recall his enthusiasm, and the dynamic youth programmes he founded at AS220 at Rhode Island. Last week First Lady Michelle Obama presented AS220 Youth with a National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award. One of fifty finalists, chosen from a pool of 350 applicants, and one of only twelve organizations to win. We’re sending a big shout out to AS220 Youth!

In the news: Capital E – the latest member to have their building closed due to earthquake risk – have found a temporary home at the Railway Social Hall on Waterloo Quay. They have hired space to run their programmes, OnTV and Sound House. Toitū Otago Settlers Museum is gearing up for their big re-opening on Dec 8th. Auckland Museums helped to solve the mystery of the dissappearing island. And the National Library is now fully open with ‘Te Ahumairangi’ – their new visitor space. ‘Te Ahumairangi’ is an exciting reconception of the traditional library space. We loved this idea for the Christchurch Cathedral now that demolition has been halted (thanks Christchurch Art Gallery).

There has also been more news of restructuring and staff moving around the country. Helen Kedgley has been appointed to the new position of Director at Pataka, and Fiona Emberton has left Puke Ariki. All this leads to more job opportunities – check out the latest on our Vacancies Page.

National Digital Forum was packed. Two days of presentations about how the culture and heritage sector are using the huge potential of digital technologies. Speakers included Piotr Adamczyk who talked about his experience at the Google Art Project; Catherine Styles showed us how National Museum of Australia’s game of associative thinking ‘Sembl’ can generate new engagement; Courtney Johnson talked about her idea for making an art collection categorised by emotion; and Suze Cairns asked ‘Are we remaking the museum in the image of the internet?’ A theme that was repeated by the speakers, both local and international, was the need for institutions to take a fresh look at their purpose. Museums are becoming less of a repository of objects and more of a generator of knowledge and stories. Day to day use of technologies is changing public expectations around access and expertise, and dissolving traditional boundaries between the institution and the outside world. All the speakers advocated for the ‘open museum’, for experimentation, risk, open access to collections and information and to actively seek out and give equal voice to their audiences.

Last week the Ministry of Business, Innovation & Employment released the latest tourism forcasts, 2012-2018. These are positive, predicting a nine percent growth in visitor spending (to $6.3 billion) and 28 percent rise in visitor numbers (to 3.3 million) by December 2018. Also predicted was a continuing decline in traditional markets such as the UK and US, off-set by strong growth from China and Australia. If this shift comes about, it will have implications for museums, as the Australian and Asian visitors make shorter trips. Read the full details here.

MA13: Hamilton, 10-12 April 2013

Thank you to everyone who has come up with ideas and suggestions for the MA13 conference. We have some really good speakers and topics lined up, and hope to squeeze in a few more yet. MA13 will start off with the second Museums Aotearoa Lecture on the evening of Wednesday 10 April, then two full days of conference, including the NZ Museum Awards dinner on Thursday 11 April, and some local tours. Early Bird registrations will open in December.

Phillipa is in Sydney this week at INTERCOM 2012, the conference of the ICOM International Committee on Museum Management, where she is giving a paper on Wednesday. The theme is #museumchallenges – which is also a Twitter hashtag. Even if you aren’t on Twitter, you can look up the conference tweets and see comments and links from and about the conference. There are delegates from over 25 countries, making it a truly international sharing of ideas and opportunities. While the challenges being shared are pretty tough – budget cuts, social change, stakeholder pressure etc – there is a really positive attitude towards the opportunities that museums need to embrace to ensure relevance and an ongoing place in society. We’ll share the experience with you in the next MAQ.

Nga mihi,
Phillipa & Talei

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News Update 22 December 2010

Kia ora

Check out the latest batch of museum news, online here (you need to be logged in to the members’ area to view).

This is an action-packed last round-up for 2010. The notices include:

  • MA11 conference registration
  • 2011 NZ Museum Awards applications
  • Attingham Summer School 2011
  • National Visitor Research project (February 2011)

All these are activities which happen early in the new year, and have deadlines, so please note them for your January ‘to do’ list!

The news includes items about some wonderful exhibitions and public programmes in museums and galleries around the country, so it’s going to be a busy summer. One that has captured media attention is Outrageous Fortune at Auckland Museum (details here). Coinciding nicely with the end of the long-running series, the exhibition promises lots of fun and through the exhibition, the show will live on, with the public invited to submit scripts to be filmed in the exhibition’s set. It is also an opportunity to consider why this particular TV show captured the attention of the nation so successfully.

Which reminds me that it also coincides with 50 years of Coronation Street. Kim Hill interviewed Sean Egan, writer of an unofficial history of ‘the street’ on 11 December, exploring some of the reasons why the series has survived so long, and remains popular in so many cultures outside of its setting in the north of England. You can listen to the interview online here. I recommend the Radio NZ website for a wide range of replayable material – great for putting onto an iPod or media player for listening on those long holiday car journeys, or while relaxing in the garden.

Other news covers the roll out of Creative NZ’s Arts Leadership Investment funding, which replaces the ‘recurrent’ scheme. So far 22 organisations have been confirmed, including Objectspace, The Physics Room and Capital E’s National Theatre for Children, and another 10 asked to provide more detailed information over the next few months. Seven other organisations that expressed interest have missed out, and are instead being directed towards another of CNZ’s new schemes, Arts Development Investment. Some newspapers have covered the story, and full details are on the CNZ website here.

Annual report ‘season’ is nearly complete for the larger museums and related organisations such as Historic Places Trust and MCH, and many of these are available online. They make interesting reading if you want to know where our money comes from/goes to and why. There is plenty of other ‘holiday reading’ online, such as:

  • Minister’s Cultural Philanthropy Taskforce report, Growing the pie released 17 December. As well as improving general promotion and recognition, recommendations include: developing a new mentoring and advice initiative; introducing ‘gift aid’; exploring cultural gifting; and matched government funding for private giving.
  • We already mentioned CNZ’s October research report, The art of the possible, on options for strengthening private sector support for the arts.
  • Shane Simpson’s book on Collections Law, covers a wide range of areas such as governance, collection management, acquisitions, deaccessioning and disposal, digitisation, import/export and repatriation, exhibitions and loans, copyright and commercial. Shane will be speaking at MA11 and this nearly completed resource makes great background.

The Board and staff of Museums Aotearoa wish all our members, friends and colleagues an enjoyable summer, and look forward to a happy and productive new year.

We’re closing the Museums Aotearoa office from Friday 24 December, and will re-open on Monday 10 January 2011.

Ngā mihi o te Kirihimete me te tau hou,

Phillipa and Sophie


MA11 conference registration

Is opening tomorrow! Look out for our announcement email launching the new website, with programme and registration information on the conference (13-15 April), keynote speakers, workshops, social events and collections BarCamp (16 April).


2011 NZ Museum Awards applications

Also opening officially tomorrow! We’ve simplified the application process and added more awards, including a ‘small museum’ category, and we’re planning a great celebration event in Nelson on 14 April. We will send out further details tomorrow, including links to download the application forms. Applications are due on 24 February 2011, so think about all those great projects and individuals you could enter from your museum or gallery.


Attingham Summer School 2011

Expressions of interest are now invited for the July 2011 Attingham Summer School. This year, The Clark Collection / Creative NZ Scholarship is not being offered. However, to ensure the continuation of this valuable opportunity, support is available through the generosity of Mr Clark for an approved candidate to attend the Attingham Summer School. Full details are on our website, here.


National Visitor Research project (February 2011)

Early in 2010 we undertook a pilot visitor research project with Victoria University of Wellington and 12 museums and galleries from around the country. The pilot was reported at the MA10 conference, and further work has now been completed to develop the methodology, survey and guidelines into a national project. Early in 2011, museums will be invited to participate in this important work to gather and benchmark visitor information nationally.


 

 

 


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