Posts Tagged 'Kahui Kaitiaki'

MA news update 4 October 2016

We hear The Suter re-opening on Sunday weekend was loads of fun for all comers. Lynn Freeman talked to Director Julie Catchpole and Board Chair Craig Potton on RNZ The Arts on Sunday. For images, see Nelson Mail and Suter Facebook page. The Suter now has a refurbished heritage building and a shiny new addition, see information about the project here. There are three new exhibitions, a new website, and we hear the cafe is as fabulous as ever!

Waitangi Maori Performance

Waitangi Maori performers pose with visitors
(Greg McManus and Phillipa Tocker)

Congratulations to the Waitangi National Trust for winning the Maori Cultural Tourism Award in the 2016 NZ Tourism Awards last week. Having experienced their cultural performance and genuine manaakitanga, I know it is richly deserved recognition of the warmth and enthusiasm which the Waitangi staff share with all their visitors.

A member recently raised a query about the new Charities and Financial Reporting requirements. There have been quite a number of workshops run by Charities, DIA and others, and some more in the wider Wellington region for smaller entities (Tier 3 and 4) – 25 October – 3 November, see notices below. There is guidance, videos and templates available online from Charities or you can check with your accountant or local Citizens Advice Bureau. If you are still confused, please let us know.

Have you voted yet? Local council ballot papers need to be posted by this Wednesday, 5 October. The outcome in some councils could make life easier or harder for museums and galleries, so we’ll be watching the results with great interest. The advocacy workshop we’re running at this year’s regional forums looks at working with councils and other stakeholders. One of the museum volunteers at our first forum in Taranaki was also a local councillor. It was a pity he couldn’t stay for the workshop session, but he explained that he needed to keep on the move as it’s ‘shooting season’ for councillors!

We’re looking forward to many more interesting and engaging forums in the coming weeks, and to this week’s Kahui Kaitiaki at Takapūwāhia Marae.

Ngā mihi,
Phillipa

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Tītiro Whakamua – Guest post by Janeen Love

The tūī’s song is most gracious and meaningful when appreciated in its natural environment.  It’s not just a contrived composition for the white noise of daily activity. When you take time to listen, really listen to the tūī’s song, its exquisitely complex, uplifting and distinctive.

That’s how I can best summarise the kōrero and speaker’s presentations at this month’s Kāhui Kaitiaki hui: Tītiro Whakamua, at Kohupātiki Marae in Clive, Hawkes Bay – a chorus of tūī.

Rose Mohi (Ngāti Kahungunu), delivers the opening address.

Rose Mohi (Ngāti Kahungunu), delivers the opening address.

Kohupātiki Marae offered a familiar setting, and yet was a little at odds with how our respective institutes and organisations usually operate. Being home in the heartland of Ngāti Kahungunu was for me a personal highlight, and perhaps gave this tūī a special pitch, with tikanga Māori as the bass note. The manaakitanga extended to us by the hapu was impeccable, and enabled the rich conversations. The food that was prepared has set the benchmark very high; karengo and tī kōuka were a real treat. The Kāhui Kaitiaki organisation committee, Tryphena Cracknell and Bridget Reweti, should again be applauded, with recognition also for the support of Te Puni Kōkiri, Museums Aotearoa and National Services Te Paerangi.

Āwhina Twomey (Whanganui Regional Museum) questions Dr Sandy O’Sullivan (Wiradjuri, Australia) during our Skype conversation.

Āwhina Twomey (Whanganui Regional Museum) questions Dr Sandy O’Sullivan (Wiradjuri, Australia) during our Skype conversation.

As a collective, we are passionate about our mahi, and thoughtful about the issues that surface in our individual roles.  The refreshing point of difference in this environment was that we didn’t need to articulate historical issues for the unfamiliar. The marae was the natural environment and enabled us to avoid being distracted by the misinformed. The conversations were elevated from the pōwhiri to the poroporoaki. There were no excuses or explanations made for being Māori, speaking Māori, tikanga was not challenged and this enabled the kōrero to reach a very natural and exhilarating crescendo. The challenges that Māori sometimes face working in the museum sector were a given.  The song sheet was the same, no tuning required.

All of the presentations offered inspiration, highlighted the inter-connection of issues our sector faces and were solution-focused. It was evident we’ve reached a maturity in 2013, that has exciting implications, but that requires patience and conversation from all parties. We are all mindful of our tupuna who charted many of our pathways. We, as Kaitiaki Māori, are at the coal-face of a new way of thinking about how we present ourselves as Māori in this landscape. This is exciting.

Janneen Love (Auckland War Memorial Museum), Mark Sykes (Te Papa Tongarewa) and Migoto Eria (MTG Hawke’s Bay) after visiting the stunning Ūkaipō exhibition at newly opened MTG Hawke’s Bay.

Janneen Love (Auckland War Memorial Museum), Mark Sykes (Te Papa Tongarewa) and Migoto Eria (MTG Hawke’s Bay) after visiting the stunning Ūkaipō exhibition at newly opened MTG Hawke’s Bay.

If I could single out one presentation that has tuned this songbird, it was the presentation given by Leo Watson on ‘The key principles established by the WAI 262 claim concerning the preservation, protection and promotion of matauranga Māori, in all of its manifestations’. Leo’s presentation, along with working definitions and ‘Kaitiakianga framework for discussion’ document, were generous and practical guides for traversing this profound and important claim that currently sits with The Crown.

http://wai262.weebly.com/leo-watson.html

http://www.waitangi-tribunal.govt.nz/news/media/wai262.asp

Returning to Tāmaki and its urban soundscapes, I am mindful of my pitch and aware of the great potential for harmonies with the many manu.  All the time I am mindful of how sweet the sound of tūī is in their natural environment.

SONY DSC

http://www.doc.govt.nz/Documents/conservation/native-animals/birds/bird-song/46-tui-morning-chorus.mp3

Janeen Love
Exhibition Developer
Auckland War Memorial Museum

He aha te kai o te rangatira? Guest Blogger Puawai Cairns

Kia ora koutou,

He mihi paku tēnei ki a koutou, ki ngā kaimahi me ngā kaitiaki o ngā taonga me ngā pakiwaitara Māori ki roto i ngā whare taonga o te motu.

Ko Ngāīterangi, Ngāti Ranginui, Ngāti Pūkenga ngā iwi. Ko Puawai Cairns ahau, tēnā anō koutou katoa.

TitiroWhakamua

I was asked to write a blog in anticipation of the upcoming Kāhui Kaitiaki Māori hui (11-13th October 2013, Kohupātiki Marae, Clive Hawkes Bay).  If I manage to make it to Hastings, it will be my third Kaitiaki hui. The most recent was only this April in Hamilton, a one-day adjunct to the MA13 conference and I think there were about 30 of us assembled at Waikato Museum.  There were lots of new faces and what was so heartening was the surprising number of young kaimahi Māori. I managed to finally meet up with Manaaki Pene from Rotorua Museum and we swapped ‘How we got into museum work’ stories. When I swap these ‘origins kinds of stories with other museum workers, there is always a common maniacally enthusiastic theme of ‘I REALLY wanted to work in a museum and would work for free if I had to’ (I adore the ‘crazy’ in kaimahi). Unfortunately for the Hamilton gathering, we weren’t introduced to each other or given much opportunity to have a group exchange, which I would have very much loved. And there were some really interesting papers presented, especially laying down for our benefit, the history of Māori engagement in NZ museums as kaimahi and as source communities. But while these stories were and are important, it felt that much of the focus of the meeting was very much looking into the past, which seemed a little bit like a lost opportunity when surveying the crowd that was there to listen. So I left that meeting feeling unresolved, as if I could have taken much more away than I did.

A Māori Challenge  Christmas card, 'With the Compliments of the Season'; circa 1900s; A. D. Willis Purchased 1995 Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa collection

A Māori Challenge
Christmas card, ‘With the Compliments of the Season’; circa 1900s; A. D. Willis
Purchased 1995
Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa collection

When we were swallowed up the next day by the many more attendees at MA13, I was also disappointed when the MA13 panels over the following few days separated Leadership and Bicultural Leadership into two separate sessions.  If bicultural relationships are truly important to museums in Aotearoa,  I would have loved to have seen non-Māori kaitiaki attending the Kaitiaki Māori meeting to share their ideas on that first day (as well as being able to have known who everyone was); and for Bicultural Leadership in the MA13 Conference firmly embedded in any discussions about Leadership. Mixing it up, engaging with each other, sharing ideas and, if necessary, have some furious debates.

So what am I hoping for at this next meeting?

A rousing welcome to our King's representative at Waitangi

“A rousing welcome to our King’s Representative at Waitangi: Warriors of the Te Arawa tribe performing a haka.”
Showing the welcome to the Governor General Lord Bledisloe and the Vice Regal party at Waitangi during the 1934 commemorative celebrations for the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi. 6 Feb 1934
Sir George Grey Special Collections, Auckland Libraries, 7-A14690

  • Meeting lots of haati new faces from around the country as well as reconnect with old friends, and especially to hear the different projects that are in progress around the motu.
  • Encouraging attendance and participation at Kaitiaki Māori hui by non-Māori colleagues. We all share a deep love of the taonga that are in our care, it would not only be a great professional development opportunity for them but we’d also be able to discuss how we share museum guardianship, and museology culture in Aotearoa.
  • Lots of discussion at every opportunity to talk about the concept that is Māori Museology – have we defined that practice? Does it exist? Are there new ways to do things? Are there existing methods which have definitely had their day? What terminologies are in use now? Are Te Tipuranga, Te Puawaitanga, Te Huringa I, II, III still useful?
  • Have we talked about the Māori audience lately? How are we addressing them? Do we know if they’re happy with museums and how we serve them?
  • Ideas and debates about our responsibility as kaitiaiki within the museums of the future to Mātauranga Māori, to Tangata Whenua, our need to address to hybrid knowledge and practices, and how to best keep in step with where Māori are going to in the future.
  • What’s happening throughout the world in the realm of indigenous museology? How are international museums handling their source community relationships? What can we learn? What can we teach?Māori Peg Doll

    Māori Peg Doll by Alexandra Edmonds, 2011.  (wood, wool, cloth, ink, paper, burlap, feather, flax, rubber)  Gift of Alex Edmonds, 2011 Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa collection

    Māori Peg Doll by Alexandra Edmonds, 2011.
    (wood, wool, cloth, ink, paper, burlap, feather, flax, rubber)
    Gift of Alex Edmonds, 2011
    Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa collection

So imagining the future for Māori and museums, I dwell on relationships – how do we continue to build and learn from relationships among future professionals, future communities, and future organisations, for the integrity of future museum practice? But I don’t see this as purely a kaimahi Māori responsibility to develop or think through, I think it is a duty that is shared by all museums in Aotearoa and those of us that choose to do the work we do.

So I’m looking forward to being bewildered by all the new and old faces and, like I said, some hefty awesome kōrero. To everyone travelling there, travel safe and hopefully see you in a few weeks.

Arohanui, Puawai

For more information and to register for Tītiro Whakamua – Kāhui Kaitiaki Hui go to: http://www.museumsaotearoa.org.nz/t%C4%ABtiro-whakamua-k%C4%81hui-kaitiaki-hui


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