Posts Tagged 'MA12'

Umberto Crenca “The Art of Community”

Finally we have Umberto Crenca’s inspiring keynote address from MA12. “The Art of Community”

Friday 20th April 2012

(note this video includes a presentation by David Cross. Bert’s talk starts at 13:45 in part 1 of 4)

Umberto Crenca – Photo by Pam Murray

Umberto Crenca is the Artistic Director and Co-Founder of AS220, a nonprofit center for the arts in Providence, Rhode Island. AS220 was established in 1985 to provide a local, unjuried, and uncensored home for the arts. The organization maintains three buildings, providing: fifty eight artist live and/or work spaces, four exhibition spaces, a print shop, two darkrooms, a technology lab, a stage, a recording studio, a black box theater, a dance studio, and a popular bar and restaurant. AS220’s permanent establishment in the City’s downtown is widely recognized as one of the first significant steps in the creation of the Providence Arts and Entertainment District.

Umberto Crenca “The Art of Community” – Part 1 of 4 from Museums Aotearoa on Vimeo.

Umberto Crenca “The Art of Community” – Part 2 of 4 from Museums Aotearoa on Vimeo.

Umberto Crenca “The Art of Community” – Part 3 of 4 from Museums Aotearoa on Vimeo.

Umberto Crenca “The Art of Community” – Part 4 of 4 from Museums Aotearoa on Vimeo.

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Jim Marchbank – Keynote address at MA12

19 April 2012

Jim Marchbank held senior management positions at Science North in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, starting in 1982 as Director of Development. He became Chief Executive Officer of Science North in 1987 and served in that capacity for 24 years before stepping down in May 2011. Under his direction Science North grew to be the largest tourist attraction in Northern Ontario, encompassing an internationally recognized science centre, a Special Exhibits Hall, a the F. Jean MacLeod Butterfly Gallery, a 2D/3D IMAX Theatre, and a digital dome planetarium. A separate earth sciences centre, Dynamic Earth, opened in spring 2003 and then went through two expansions with the most recent addition opening in 2009. In March 2011 Science North reopened after a short closure with the most substantial capital renewal of visitor experiences the science centre had undergone since opening in 1984. Science North is Canada’s 2nd largest science centre located in Canada’s 23rd largest metropolitan area.

Jim Marchbank – Former CEO, Science North part 1 from Museums Aotearoa on Vimeo.

Jim Marchbank – Former CEO, Science North part 2 from Museums Aotearoa on Vimeo.

Jim Marchbank – Former CEO, Science North part 3 from Museums Aotearoa on Vimeo.

Jim Marchbank held senior management positions at Science North in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, starting in 1982 as Director of Development. He became Chief Executive Officer of Science North in 1987 and served in that capacity for 24 years before stepping down in May 2011. Under his direction Science North grew to be the largest tourist attraction in Northern Ontario, encompassing an internationally recognized science centre, a Special Exhibits Hall, a the F. Jean MacLeod Butterfly Gallery, a 2D/3D IMAX Theatre, and a digital dome planetarium. A separate earth sciences centre, Dynamic Earth, opened in spring 2003 and then went through two expansions with the most recent addition opening in 2009. In March 2011 Science North reopened after a short closure with the most substantial capital renewal of visitor experiences the science centre had undergone since opening in 1984. Science North is Canada’s 2nd largest science centre located in Canada’s 23rd largest metropolitan area.

Jim Marchbank was President of the international Giant Screen Theater Association (GSTA), an association representing educational large-format or IMAX theatres, in 1999-2000. He was a member of the Board of the Association of Science and Technology Centers from 1993 to 1999, and served as a member of the Organizing Committee for the 2008 World Congress of Science Centres. He was the first President of the Canadian Association of Science Centres (CASC).

Mr. Marchbank was executive producer of a large format film, Gold Fever produced by Science North and released June 1999. It was funded largely by gold mining companies. He was co-executive producer of the large format film Jane Goodall’s Wild Chimpanzees released in May 2002. It was a collaboration of three science centres with corporate and American government funding. He was Executive Producer of Wings Over the North: A 4D Bush Plane Adventure, a $2 million productionreleased in June 2004, a collaboration with a small aviation museum. Mr. Marchbank was the Executive Producer for Mysteries of the Great Lakes, a large format film directed, produced and distributed by Science North and released May 2008.

As CEO of Science North Mr. Marchbank helped develop North America’s only science centre-university joint post-graduate program in science communication with Sudbury’s Laurentian University. The program has now graduated over 60 students with post graduate Diplomas in Science Communication who are working in science communication roles around the world.

Science North added a large external sales unit under Mr. Marchbank’s leadership. This unit sold exhibits, programs and services to science centres, government agencies and corporations around the world earning resources which were invested at home in Science North. The unit led Science North into partnerships with others that helped create major travelling exhibits for Science North which have toured North America and been enjoyed by millions of science centre and museum visitors.

In March 1993, Jim was awarded the Commemorative Medal for the 125th anniversary of Canadian Confederation. He was named one of 50 Distinguished Graduates recognized by Laurentian University on its 50th Anniversary in 2011. He is the recipient of an Honorourary Degree from Thorneloe University in Sudbury and a Lifetime Achievement Award of the Canadian Association of Science Centres. Upon stepping down as CEO of Science North he was made an Honourary Life Member, the centre’s highest recognition.

MA12 Panel Discussion – Whakakotahitanga – working together

Panel Discussion – Wednesday 18th April, 2012

Whakakotahitanga – working together

Chair – Darcy Nicholas

Haami Piripi and Phil Cross: Creating Te Ahu, reflecting the cultures of 7 iwi

Wayne Ngata: Maori and Science converging for the Transit of Venus

Whakakotahitanga – working together 1 from Museums Aotearoa on Vimeo.

Whakakotahitanga – working together 2 from Museums Aotearoa on Vimeo.

Whakakotahitanga – working together 3 from Museums Aotearoa on Vimeo.

Mike Hollings keynote address at MA12

Wednesday 18 April 2012, 10.30am-11.30am at Soundings Theatre, Te Papa

Mike Hollings (Ngāti Raukawa) has more than 30 years wide-ranging experience in the education sector, from teaching through to management, policy development, and review. For the past five years he has been the Chief Executive of Te Kura (The Correspondence School of New Zealand). Prior to joining Te Kura, Mike was the National Manager Analysis and Policy at the Education Review Office with responsibility for evaluating the quality of education in New Zealand schools and was the acting Chief Executive between June 2005 and May 2006. He was the Chief Executive of Te Mangai Paho, the Māori Broadcasting Funding Agency from 1996 to 1999 and has held various senior management positions at Te Puni Kōkiri, The Ministry of Māori Development.

In his home community, Mike has led the establishment of Te Kōhanga Reo (early childhood Māori language immersion educatino) and Kura Kaupapa Māori (Māori language immersion education in primary and secondary schooling).

Mike Hollings, Chief Executive, Te Kura, The Correspondence School of New Zealand Part 1 from Museums Aotearoa on Vimeo.

Mike Hollings, Chief Executive, Te Kura, The Correspondence School of New Zealand Part 2 from Museums Aotearoa on Vimeo.

News Update 14 June

Kia ora,

There have been consultations and announcements about council funding around the country, and most councils seem to be continuing to support culture and heritage – although not always as much as we would hope. In this financial climate just holding the status quo can be seen as a victory. The newspapers are covering museum and gallery activities around the country, and the latest news can be read by members on our website here. In other news, we were delighted to hear that Mana Recovery won the Green Gold category at the Wellington Gold Awards last week. Mana Recovery employ people with disabilities, and made our wonderful recycled banner bags for the MA12 conference. The Gold Awards also recognised Denis Adam, whose Adam Foundation has been very supportive of the arts. And a reminder that you can listen to Radio NZ broadcasts via the internet, including an interview with Aotea Utanganui’s Cameron Curd on last week’s Arts on Sunday and an item on the proposed Hundertwasser Arts Centre in Whangarei the week before.

Statistics and research
Museum organisations should have received an invitation from Strategic Pay to participate in this year’s museum sector remuneration survey. Now in its third year, this survey is providing extremely useful information. MA worked with Strategic Pay to set up the survey, and reviews it each year. The report is available for purchase by participating organisations. If you are interested, or your museum has not received an invitation, please contact Strategic Pay or the MA office.

We are working on an expanded museum sector research project. This will provide a comprehensive overview of the museum sector, identify and measure sector trends, and inform and assist with advocacy and strategic and business planning. We will be contacting museum organisations shortly to explain the project and seek information.

Philanthropy
Philanthropy is top of mind at Creative New Zealand these days. They have recently appointed Jean Goodband in the new role of Manager, Private Giving and Partnerships Programme and are hosting the Guy Mallabone Sessions on fundraising. They will shortly be launching a new philanthropy programme to help the arts sector to identify and develop alternative sources of funding. “There is huge potential to grow a culture of giving to the arts in New Zealand and this programme will be key to realising this,” Jean says.

New Zealanders and the Arts
Creative New Zealand has also recently made available online the reports from its research New Zealanders and the Arts: Attitudes, Attendance and Participation in 2011. This project aims to provide insights that help the arts community and its supporters identify new trends in a changing environment and take up new opportunities. The research was conducted by independent research company Colmar Brunton. It builds on previous research in 2005 and 2008. A full report of the national results and a video of New Zealanders talking about what the arts mean to them are available on the Creative New Zealand website.

MCH appointments
As well as moving their office down the street – to almost opposite MA – the Ministry for Culture and Heritage has just made appointments to three new staff positions. Dr David Butts will move from Tairawhiti Museum to the role of Manager Heritage Operations in July, and Ralph Johnson will be Manager Heritage Policy. Bev Hong has joined the Cultural Policy Branch as Senior Adviser, Cultural Sector Research – we will be working with Bev and Murray Costello on our museum sector statistics project.

Mystery Item
Karel Kaio, Collections Manager at Kiwi North (Whangarei Museum and Heritage Park) was searching through some unregistered museum dental items and has come across one that has her stumped. Can you help identify this tool?

Dimensions are : 225mm (L) x 880mm (W) x 50mm (H). Materials: Bone (handle) and Brass

CONTACT INFO: Karel Kaio, Collections Manager, Kaitiaki Taonga P: +64 9 438 9630 ext 3 E: karel@kiwinorth.co.nz

 

Nga mihi o Matariki,
Phillipa & Talei

Reflections on MA 12 – Ashley Mackenzie-White

Today we have an account by Ashley Mackenzie-White who left the conference full of questions.

MA12: Collaboration in Practice, 18-20 April 2012

 ‘They don’t realise they are experiencing art, but they have a feeling’ – Umberto Crenca 

It is a week since I walked out of Te Papa, acutely aware that the buzz of the MA12 conference would wear off and that soon I would find myself unable to turn to someone who just gets it. As it was said at the end of the 3 day conference; there will always be more questions than answers.  For me, these questions include:

Why didn’t I know about the amazing work of Te Kura before now and how are we, the museum sector going to help?

Why don’t we have our own version of AS220 in Aotearoa?

Why didn’t Pou Temara speak to the entire audience?

Why, in a museum filled with post it notes, was there no place to comment on what we loved, liked or disliked about MA12?

Why at a conference made up of discussions about tikanga Maori, taonga Maori, and more centrally collaboration, was there no discussion about the recently cancelled work by the Mexican artist, Teresa Margolles? Isn’t this decision relevant to all people who work in our sector as it raises questions about consultation and collaboration, censorship and cultural sensitivities, tikanga and korero?

In the three days at MA12, I heard about the exciting projects happening in the Far North.  I learnt that as beneficial as licensing trusts may be, it is the people that always come first, and that we should never take them or the time we have with them for granted. I heard many times how we should feel the fear and just do it. I heard that cooperation is about meaningful involvement, that museums are places of social commentary and that sometimes people have to put their ideals aside to enable a better community. I got excited about boosted.org.nz as well as equal pay. On Day Two, I was pleased to learn thanks to Jim Marchbank – former CEO of Science North, Sudbury, North Ontario – that there are commercial companies that want a long lasting experience that ‘emotional response’ rather than to slap us with their brand.  I was shown, thanks to the amazing people of Canterbury, the transformative power of art, the power of the human spirit, and the importance of our cultural & heritage institutions in the face of disaster.  

For those at the conference, or around Aotearoa, who were privileged to hear and meet Umberto Crenca from AS220, Providence, Rhode Island, you will have experienced that same awe, inspiration, faith and perhaps frustration that I felt during and after his keynote address on the closing day of the conference. These same emotions came to the fore when Coralie Winn from Christchurch showed us the stunning work of the Gap Filer community where all things from fridges full of books, to sculpture,  fill the spaces where buildings once stood.

Museums, galleries, archives, libraries, public spaces and government departments all have the ability to change people and their communities.  Museums, galleries, archives, libraries, public spaces and government departments survive by virtue of the values and passion that fulfil us. This was seen in the conference bags, made from exhibition advertising and lovingly reconstructed by the team at Mana Recovery. These bags are a physical manifestation of what the conference taught me; that it is the people that paint the pipes in copper colour then sprinkle them with dust that will save us from the ‘cuts’.

To the casual observer, the conference went extremely smoothly and our national museum was a gracious host. Phillipa and Sophie and their team have again pulled off a tour de force on their limited budget and tight resources, so hats off to them for a highly successful and engaging MA12.

Ashley Mackenzie-White
Manatū Taonga Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Reflections on MA12 – Casimar Larkin

Today’s account of the conference is by Casimar Larkin from Parliamentary Service, where current work includes the displays and collections within the parliamentary precincts and keeping these relevant in our changing times.

Passion, collaboration and community

The MA12 Conference was the second of Museum Aotearoa’s conferences I’ve attended.  Again, I found the opportunity provided for networking was invaluable.  Of the three days of this conference, it was the third that I found the most thought-provoking.  Umberto Crenca was an inspired choice to start the final day, imbuing enthusiasm and passion into all he spoke about.  His dedication to improving communities through access to art for all was an ethos that spoke to me and I agree with.  I felt this philosophy was echoed with his statement that art is not a mirror to the world, but a hammer to shape it.

‘Art is not a mirror to the world but a hammer to shape it.’ – Umberto Crenca

The panel discussion following this, being comprised of the ‘Art Crowd’, really articulated the theme of the conference with their diverse examples of collaborations.  These ranged from the expected, other galleries and museums, to the unexpected, a licensing trust made up of rugby playing men who now feel a sense of ownership towards an art gallery.  It emphasised to me that to really succeed in collaboration, it is important to not just look at the obvious choices, but to reach out across the community.

MA12 audience

However, it was the final panel of speakers from Christchurch who were the most inspirational.  Their devotion to their institutions, as well as to their city, was stirring.  I admire their resolve to ensure that everyone outside of Canterbury has opportunities to learn from their misfortunes to improve and be better prepared in the event of disasters.  The best example of making the best of a bad situation shone through for me in the creativity of Coralie Winn and her work with Gap Filler.  Her work taking art and culture to the community to fill up the desolate spaces left by demolished buildings is amazing.  As is her hope that this creativity and imagination will become a way of life and carry through the rebuilding of Christchurch and beyond.

Casimar Larkin
Parliamentary Service


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