Posts Tagged 'MA13'

He aha te kai o te rangatira? Guest Blogger Puawai Cairns

Kia ora koutou,

He mihi paku tēnei ki a koutou, ki ngā kaimahi me ngā kaitiaki o ngā taonga me ngā pakiwaitara Māori ki roto i ngā whare taonga o te motu.

Ko Ngāīterangi, Ngāti Ranginui, Ngāti Pūkenga ngā iwi. Ko Puawai Cairns ahau, tēnā anō koutou katoa.

TitiroWhakamua

I was asked to write a blog in anticipation of the upcoming Kāhui Kaitiaki Māori hui (11-13th October 2013, Kohupātiki Marae, Clive Hawkes Bay).  If I manage to make it to Hastings, it will be my third Kaitiaki hui. The most recent was only this April in Hamilton, a one-day adjunct to the MA13 conference and I think there were about 30 of us assembled at Waikato Museum.  There were lots of new faces and what was so heartening was the surprising number of young kaimahi Māori. I managed to finally meet up with Manaaki Pene from Rotorua Museum and we swapped ‘How we got into museum work’ stories. When I swap these ‘origins kinds of stories with other museum workers, there is always a common maniacally enthusiastic theme of ‘I REALLY wanted to work in a museum and would work for free if I had to’ (I adore the ‘crazy’ in kaimahi). Unfortunately for the Hamilton gathering, we weren’t introduced to each other or given much opportunity to have a group exchange, which I would have very much loved. And there were some really interesting papers presented, especially laying down for our benefit, the history of Māori engagement in NZ museums as kaimahi and as source communities. But while these stories were and are important, it felt that much of the focus of the meeting was very much looking into the past, which seemed a little bit like a lost opportunity when surveying the crowd that was there to listen. So I left that meeting feeling unresolved, as if I could have taken much more away than I did.

A Māori Challenge  Christmas card, 'With the Compliments of the Season'; circa 1900s; A. D. Willis Purchased 1995 Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa collection

A Māori Challenge
Christmas card, ‘With the Compliments of the Season’; circa 1900s; A. D. Willis
Purchased 1995
Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa collection

When we were swallowed up the next day by the many more attendees at MA13, I was also disappointed when the MA13 panels over the following few days separated Leadership and Bicultural Leadership into two separate sessions.  If bicultural relationships are truly important to museums in Aotearoa,  I would have loved to have seen non-Māori kaitiaki attending the Kaitiaki Māori meeting to share their ideas on that first day (as well as being able to have known who everyone was); and for Bicultural Leadership in the MA13 Conference firmly embedded in any discussions about Leadership. Mixing it up, engaging with each other, sharing ideas and, if necessary, have some furious debates.

So what am I hoping for at this next meeting?

A rousing welcome to our King's representative at Waitangi

“A rousing welcome to our King’s Representative at Waitangi: Warriors of the Te Arawa tribe performing a haka.”
Showing the welcome to the Governor General Lord Bledisloe and the Vice Regal party at Waitangi during the 1934 commemorative celebrations for the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi. 6 Feb 1934
Sir George Grey Special Collections, Auckland Libraries, 7-A14690

  • Meeting lots of haati new faces from around the country as well as reconnect with old friends, and especially to hear the different projects that are in progress around the motu.
  • Encouraging attendance and participation at Kaitiaki Māori hui by non-Māori colleagues. We all share a deep love of the taonga that are in our care, it would not only be a great professional development opportunity for them but we’d also be able to discuss how we share museum guardianship, and museology culture in Aotearoa.
  • Lots of discussion at every opportunity to talk about the concept that is Māori Museology – have we defined that practice? Does it exist? Are there new ways to do things? Are there existing methods which have definitely had their day? What terminologies are in use now? Are Te Tipuranga, Te Puawaitanga, Te Huringa I, II, III still useful?
  • Have we talked about the Māori audience lately? How are we addressing them? Do we know if they’re happy with museums and how we serve them?
  • Ideas and debates about our responsibility as kaitiaiki within the museums of the future to Mātauranga Māori, to Tangata Whenua, our need to address to hybrid knowledge and practices, and how to best keep in step with where Māori are going to in the future.
  • What’s happening throughout the world in the realm of indigenous museology? How are international museums handling their source community relationships? What can we learn? What can we teach?Māori Peg Doll

    Māori Peg Doll by Alexandra Edmonds, 2011.  (wood, wool, cloth, ink, paper, burlap, feather, flax, rubber)  Gift of Alex Edmonds, 2011 Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa collection

    Māori Peg Doll by Alexandra Edmonds, 2011.
    (wood, wool, cloth, ink, paper, burlap, feather, flax, rubber)
    Gift of Alex Edmonds, 2011
    Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa collection

So imagining the future for Māori and museums, I dwell on relationships – how do we continue to build and learn from relationships among future professionals, future communities, and future organisations, for the integrity of future museum practice? But I don’t see this as purely a kaimahi Māori responsibility to develop or think through, I think it is a duty that is shared by all museums in Aotearoa and those of us that choose to do the work we do.

So I’m looking forward to being bewildered by all the new and old faces and, like I said, some hefty awesome kōrero. To everyone travelling there, travel safe and hopefully see you in a few weeks.

Arohanui, Puawai

For more information and to register for Tītiro Whakamua – Kāhui Kaitiaki Hui go to: http://www.museumsaotearoa.org.nz/t%C4%ABtiro-whakamua-k%C4%81hui-kaitiaki-hui

Advertisements

News Update 4 June 2013

Kia ora,

The new MA Board met for the first time in Wellington on 13 May. We reviewed feedback from the MA13 conference and Kahui Kaitiaki, and planned priority activities for the coming months. We are excited to be working on a series of regional forums for members and museum staff to get together to discuss key issues. The first of these will be in Napier on 11 July.

MA13 conference material is now online, including videos of keynote presentations on YouTube.

We are delighted to see that Auckland Museum, finalist in the 2013 NZ Museum Awards for its energy saving project, is now a finalist in the Green Ribbon Awards to be announced at Parliament tomorrow (World Environment Day).

Dr Ian Griffin, new Director of Otago Museum has told Kathryn Ryan on Radio NZ’s Nine to Noon that ‘museums are absolutely critical to any civilised society’. Listen to the interview to hear more of his background and ideas about museums in general and Otago Museum in particular.

The Museums Australia conference in Canberra was a good opportunity to see how colleagues across the Tasman are dealing with very similar challenges and issues as we are. In some areas they seem to be doing well – while funding is always an issue, the general feeling was positive, and some exciting projects were showcased. In engagement with indigenous and diverse communities there was recognition that there is much that Australia can learn from Aotearoa. Canberra was in celebratory mood, with a year-long programme of festivals and events marking its centenary. While I wasn’t in the right place at the right time to see it floating above the city, Patricia Piccinini’s Skywhale hot-air balloon sculpture occasioned much discussion alongside the more serious conference topics.

Phillipa with The Lady Denman

Phillipa with The Lady Denman

On the way back from Canberra I stopped in at the Lady Denman Maritime Museum in Jervis Bay. I had not planned the visit – it was raining, the museum happened to be well-signposted, and I was looking for a break from driving. While I didn’t wander the extensive grounds and outbuildings because of the rain, there was plenty to see inside besides the centrepiece Sydney Harbour ferry ‘Lady Denman’ (1911-1979) which was built nearby. The museum has the eclectic collection of miscellany you expect in a community museum, including local history, shipwreck stories, and an extensive personal collection of surveyors’ instruments and maritime memorabilia. As a hub for its community, I experienced the strains of the local men’s choir rehearsing, a delightful volunteer who wanted to share her enthusiasm for every aspect of the museum, and could have purchased local art and craft. In addition, I found that the museum manager (and only paid staff member) was MA member Melinda Loe, formerly of Te Papa and more recently the Rocks Discovery Museum in Sydney. Mel has been there a few months now, and would love more visits from fellow New Zealanders.

He tangata, He tangata, He tangata! the theme for National Volunteer week, 16-22 June. This is a special time to recognise and celebrate the wonderful work of volunteers, without whom many museums simply could not operate. See Volunteering NZ for resources and ideas. Also coming up is Maori Language Week, 1-7 July, with the theme Ngā Ingoa Māori – Māori names. Coming alongside Matariki, there are ideas, activities and resources on the Korero Māori website and MLW Facebook page.

Ngā mihi,
Phillipa and Talei

STOP PRESS – MA14 conference, Napier, 2-4 April 2014

Reserve the dates now, and send us your ideas any time. We’ll put out a preliminary call for contributions very soon.

News Update 17 April 2013

Kia ora,

Whew!  We’re back in the office in damp Wellington after a wonderful time in Hamilton.  The sun shone, our Waikato hosts were generous and welcoming, and it seems a good time was had by all.  We thank all the conference presenters and participants, and particularly the 200+ delegates – without your attendance and enthusiasm, there would be no conference.

2013-04 MA13 banner pic SM

We congratulate all the 2013 NZ Museum Awards entrants, finalists and of course the winners: Auckland Museum, Christchurch Art Gallery, the Fashion Museum, The Kauri Museum and Toitu Otago Settlers Museum. These are great examples of excellence and innovation.

At the awards celebration dinner we were delighted to announce a new professional development grant in partnership with the Asia New Zealand Foundation – see our website. We also acknowledged Finn McCahon-Jones, winner of The Clark Collection Scholarship for 2013.  Finn is Associate Curator, Applied Arts & Design at Auckland Museum.  The scholarship is supported by National Services Te Paerangi, and Finn will travel to the UK to attend the Attingham Summer School and visit other organisations in England.

We have conference and awards photos up on Facebook, where you’re welcome to tag and comment. An email link to the post-conference survey will be sent out later this week.  We are very keen to hear your feedback and ideas for MA14 in Hawke’s Bay!

Last week we also held the 2012 Museums Aotearoa AGM in Hamilton. Here is a brief summary:
– the 2012 Annual Report was presented orally – it will be printed and mailed out with the next MAQ in May
– the 2102 Financial Accounts can be downloaded from our website here
– the 2012 museum sector survey results can be downloaded as Executive Summary or the full 2012 Sector Survey Report
– the revised Code of Ethics was endorsed, subject to consideration of any further comments from members by the Board at its next meeting (date mid-May tbc)

The result of the MA Board election is:
– Therese Angelo (Museum) – re-elected, Chair
– Tryphena Cracknell (Kaitiaki) – elected
– Eric Dorfman (Museum) – re-elected
– Jenny Harper (Individual) – second term continues
– Brett Mason (Individual) – elected (first term)
– Rhonda Paku (Museum) – elected (first term)

We haven’t had time to keep up with the museum and gallery news around the country over the past week, so we’ll be back with that and other events next week. In the mean time we’ve updated the opportunities, links and notices below.

Nga mihi, Phillipa, Talei and the MA13 team

News Update 8 April 2013

Kia ora,

While we’ve been working towards this week’s MA13 conference on Hamilton, other things have been happening around the country. Te Papa has made a splash, opening a re-vamped art exhibition space for ‘Nga toi: Arts Te Papa’.  The opening by Minister Chris Finlayson, was up-beat, with CE Mike Houlihan and Board member Evan Williams both sharing their excitement for  refreshed and expanded art programme at Te Papa.  After all the recent re-vision, shake-up and changes there, it will be good to see some positive, outward-looking activity.

Radio New Zealand continues to give excellent coverage of museums and gallery matters. Listen online to the Easter interview with CE Mike Houlihan on changes at Te Papa, MA13 panel convenor Ngahuia Te Awekotuku, and Christchurch Art Gallery Director and MA Board member Jenny Harper interviewed by Lyn Freeman on The Arts on Sunday.

Some of you may remember Miri Young, who worked with Museums Aotearoa on the MA10 conference in New Plymouth, and received a Mina McKenzie Scholarship when she went to the USA on a Fulbright fellowship in 2010. Miri has sent links to two projects she worked on/is working on in New York which were profiled on the front page of the New York Times Weekend Arts section this week: Judd’s 101 Spring Street and Whales from Te Papa at the American Natural History Museum. Miri proudly thanks everyone who supported and encouraged her on either or both of these projects. It’s great to see Miri doing such interesting work, and we look forward to her eventual return home to bring her experience back to our museum profession.

Meanwhile, some of our advocacy work has paid off.  Earlier in the year MA asked the Ministry of Education for some clarification on LEOTC funding.  Their proposed review of LEOTC seemed to have stalled, and many museums were in the dark as to what might happen when current contracts expire.  In answer to our request for information, we were told by MoE that, “The Ministry will be offering providers the opportunity to extend all current LEOTC contracts through variation to June 2014, as it considers future options for the LEOTC programme as a whole.” All current providers were to be notified by the end of March. While this is not a satisfactory situation looking forward, at least they have acknowledged that providers are entitled to be kept informed. We will continue to press the MoE for engagement and progress, and invite MA members to advise us of any changes or information that affects their LEOTC funding.

We’re looking forward to seeing many of you in Hamilton this week.  Note that all MA staff will be at the conference so may not be checking emails and the like until next Tuesday 16th April.

Nga mihi, Phillipa, Talei and the MA13 team

News Update 26 March 2013

Kia ora,

Recent events in Wellington include the return of the found and restored Jim Allen’s Christ figure to Futuna Chapel in Karori. This is a tale of museum intrigue and successful salvage by some very dedicated supporters of Futuna, and the day was suitably moving as well as celebratory.  The restoration was carried out by Carolina Izzo, and Greer Twiss made new nails and crown of thorns to replace those that were lost. Carolina is also involved in a new initiative to share conservation experience and expertise between New Zealand and Italy.  The first offering of the Sybillam Project is a study tour to Italy in October/November 2013 in conjunction with Victoria University’s Professional and Executive Development programme.

Nationally, the Arts Foundation launched Boosted, a new arts-focussed crowd-funding website which is specially tailored for New Zealand and aligns with tax exemptions for charitable donations. Initial projects include the Christchurch Art Gallery who want to Populate Christchurch with Art.

Waiheke Island has always been at the forefront of environmentalism and do-it-yourself activism. The Waiheke Community Art Gallery has been making a splash with its BYO BAG project. US artist Dianna Cohen has worked with plastic as an art material for years, and is now combining that work with a campaign to raise awareness and encourage action to address the global problem of plastic pollution. They have a Facebook page as well as an exhibition and lots of events and activities.

Dianne was interviewed by Lynn Freeman on Radio NZ’s Nine to Noon. See also the Plastic Garbage Project.

The AAM’s Future of Museums latest Trendswatch 2013 is now out. You can download it here but be warned – it is some 20MB which took me 10 minutes to download on inner-city broadband. We’ve saved a smaller version which we can email to you if you contact the office.

The National Digital Forum (NDF) has started 2013 with renewed activity. They have launched a monthly e-newsletter, and you can subscribe at: http://www.ndf.org.nz/join-the-ndf-mailing/ Membership of NDF is free for any organisation that is interested in being part of the ‘digital GLAMS’, and is a great way to keep up and share in this collegial networking forum – and the annual conference in November is always a buzz.

April 1st is not only a day for pranks, but also the day when several tax-related law changes come into effect (we won’t comment on the correlation). The main changes are:

  • students loan repayments rate rises from 10c to 12c in the dollar
  • Kiwisaver minimum contributions for both earners and employers rise from 2% to 3%
  • the minimum wage rises to $13.75 per hour, or $11 for youth or those in training
  • ACC work levy rates rise in some categories, including ‘museum operation’ from $0.30 to $0.32

Find out more at these websites: Student loans and Kiwisaver: www.ird.govt.nz/changes or http://payrollchanges.ird.govt.nz ACC levies: www.acc.co.nz/about-acc/levies/WPC116961

Reminders: as we count down to MA13, the NZ Museum Awards and the MA AGM in Hamilton next month, please note that

  • Museum members have been sent information on voting for Board vacancies, this needs to be done online by 10 April or in person at the AGM
  • There are interest group workshops and a free public lecture (followed by a welcome function) on Wednesday 10 April
  • The main conference days are 11 and 12 April, including 2 keynote speakers and the 2013 Museum Awards dinner
  • You can still register for MA13 – check the website or contact the office.

We’re looking forward to seeing many of you in Hamilton,

Nga mihi, Phillipa, Talei and the MA13 team

News Update 29 January 2013

Kia ora ,

Greetings to all from sunny, warm – and still – Wellington. We’re so enjoying this summer weather that focussing on office matters is hard, and the beach is beckoning….

2013-01-29_MA_view

View from The MA office

However, we have actually been very busy. MA13 conference planning is coming along, and we have 10 registrations so far. Keep checking the website for additional programme information. While you’re in the Waikato, NZHPT has launched a Waikato War interpretation project, which includes a driving tour of 13 sites and an education package, plus signage at several sites and a commemorative carved gateway at Rangiriri. We’ll have brochures in the conference packs. If you want to check it out ahead of time, go to www.thewaikatowar.co.nz (hosted on the Hamilton & Waikato Tourism website).

Thank you to everyone who has already renewed membership for 2013. We sent out invoices and renewal notices in December, and with our financial year ending on 31 December, we’re getting ready for our annual audit. All this has to be completed in time to prepare the Annual report for the AGM on 11 April. We are getting ready to send out the meeting notification and call for nominations for Board vacancies in February, and planning to run the election by post/email prior to the AGM.

The 2013 edition of our Directory was mailed in December, with bulk copies delivered to museum members by NZ Couriers. If you haven’t yet seen a copy, please check with your mailroom, loading dock, or whoever distributes incoming mail.

2012 National Visitor Survey will be activated in February. We are working on setting up the web data entry, and will be emailing information to museums next week. You will be invited to conduct the survey over one week during February 2013 (covering at least six opening days, or for a period of two weeks, whichever is less), following the instructions provided in an information kit to ensure consistent data gathering approaches. You can then enter the survey data into the Museums Aotearoa database using a simple secure web interface which will immediately show your data against the national data, in graphs and downloadable pdfs. In 2011 there were 32 museums participating, 35 in 2012, and we hope more again this year. As the database grows, we will be able to provide more analysis and trend data.

We also expect to open applications for the 2013 NZ Museum Awards next week, with a due date of 11 March. So think about all those great projects you’ve completed over the past year, gather photos and information about them, and share your success. Finalists will be acknowledged and promoted, as well as the winners in each category.

And a reminder that applications The Clark Collection Scholarship are due next Monday, 4 February, and the Mina McKenzie Scholarship on Monday, 11 February. You can download scholarship information from our website or contact the office for details. Several other opportunities have deadlines looming too, see listings below.

Curious museums online:

  • Late last year the Museum of Wellington City & Sea held another very successful Curiosity Roadshow. This annual event showcases Wellington’s weird and wonderful curios: Are they worth something? Do they tell a story? Are they just fabulously unique? See highlights here.
  • Only in the USA: the founder/curator claims to have heard a voice from ‘the mustards’ in an all-night grocery on 27 October 1986 telling him, ‘If you collect us, they will come’. The Mustard Museum is now a bona fide non-profit museum open 7 days a week in Middleton, Wisconsin.
  • If you’re thinking of travelling Route 66, check out the Devil’s Rope Museum in Illinois.
  • And for a museum whose tag-line is ‘Any day above ground is a good one’, try the NMFH.

Nga mihi, Phillipa & Talei

News Update 14 December 2012

Kia ora ,

As we hurtle towards the end of 2012 there is lots of museum news from around the country. The re-opening of Toitū Otago Settlers Museum, new exhibitions and summer activities around the country such as Te Papa’s gingerbread house. There are some controversies as well, with varying opinions on fundraising for the redevelopment of the Sarjeant Gallery, and a mystery surrounding Waikato Museum’s fake Lindauer.

The re-opening of Toitū Otago Settlers Museum was a series of celebrations, with guests from around the country as well as Dunedin and Otago. The museum has retained some old favourites such as the settlers portraits and Pixietown, hugely improved and expanded the display of key textile, social history and transport collections, and added new dimensions of interactive objects and information.

20121207_Toitu_opening_P1000576

Toitū Otago Settlers Museum Opening

Director Linda Wigley spoke about their aim to move beyond the ‘book on the wall’ approach, and the enormous team effort which made it all possible. It was particularly encouraging to hear the Mayor, Dave Cull, speaking so positively and supportively at the civic opening, reflecting the strong working relationship between the Dunedin City Council and Toitū. The staff sang their waiata with feeling, and there were some emotional moments as key people were thanked, including project development manager Bronwyn Simes. Our congratulations to all concerned.

Toitū has had excellent coverage in the media, including this radio interview with Director Linda Wigley on The Arts on Sunday the week before the opening:

http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/artsonsunday/audio/2540277/toitu-otago-settlers-museum

Congratulations also to Te Tuhi on being voted best Public Art Gallery in Metro’s Best of Auckland 2012 awards. The magazine is not online, but you can see what makes them so good on the Te Tuhi website.

In Wellington, policy and politics continue. Earlier this year MCH organised a series of workshops to explore the possibility of legislation for Immunity from Seizure, and we noted at the time that there was a move towards this in Australia. The legislation for Immunity from Seizure was introduced in Canberra recently, as the Protection of Cultural Objects on Loan Bill. We will keep you informed as this progresses on both sides of the Tasman.

The Charities Commission has been working on engagement between business and community organisations, and jointly commissioned some research with Creative New Zealand earlier this year. Their report is now published, and has some great insights and vision for how charities can design and achieve beneficial business/community partnerships.

Phillipa recently attended the INTERCOM conference #museumchallenges (see conference tweets) in Sydney. INTERCOM is the ICOM international committee on museum management, and the conference was attended by around 70 delegates from 20+ countries. There were really interesting presentations and useful conversations with people from museums – and museum associations and government agencies – which reflected many common challenges throughout the world of museums. Several people from New Zealand were there, including Tarisi Vunidilo, Secretary-General of the Pacific Islands Museum Association and Greg McManus, current Chair of the INTERCOM committee.

20121214_INTERCOM_PT-TarisiVunidilo_P1000462

Phillipa Tocker and Tarisi Vunidilo

As part of the conference, the annual Stephen Weil Memorial Lecture was given by Frank Howarth, Director of the Australian Museum in Sydney. His title was ‘Do Indians Belong with Dinosaurs?’, in which he explored indigenous cultural engagement: the relationship of the institution with indigenous communities, and how the perspective of the ‘other’ is part of the story itself. We look forward to this lecture being published, and to the continuing debate.

This afternoon we are awaiting delivery of the 2013 Directory from the printer, which will be sent out next week. We also expect to open registration for the MA13 conference next week. We will be here until Friday 17 December, then closing the office until 14 January 2013.

And for your Friday afternoon enjoyment, check out the Museum of Coffee Machines in Milan – yes, it really does exist, set up by Gruppo Cimbali to celebrate over 100 years of business.

Ngā mihi,
Phillipa & Talei


Museums Aotearoa Tweets

Join Museums Aotearoa

Advertisements

%d bloggers like this: