Posts Tagged 'Museums Aotearoa'

News Update 21 April 2016

Kia ora

In late 2015 MA and Te Papa held a series of sector collaboration workshops, which we summarised in an open letter last November. Since then we have continued to work with Te Papa on specific priorities and actions. MA and Te Papa have jointly set out work to date and some targets and timeframes here. You are invited to contribute to and provide feedback on these priorities for sector collaboration and we will continue to provide updates on progress.

Here in the MA office we are very busy wrangling the MA16 Museums Australasia conference and ServiceIQ 2016 NZ Museum Awards. With over 500 delegates already, we have room for a few more, and you can still register for adjunct events such as the Digital Academy, EMP mini-conference, Graduate Research Symposium and Kaitiaki/Indigenous hui. Visit the MA16 website for all details.

ServiceIQ NZ Museum Awards finalists will be announced this week. The winners will be announced at a reception at the Aotea Centre from 5.15pm on Wednesday 18 May – which happens to be International Museum Day. It will be a celebration of international scale as we present the winners of the Museums Australia and MAPDA Awards at the same event.  We are inviting finalists/winners and would-be winners to take part in a masterclass on the morning of Thursday 19 May.

Elsewhere, a working group of museum professionals has been developing Operational Guidelines for Working Objects – items which are part of your collection, and which you demonstrate or operate for visitors. A draft has now been prepared for sector feedback – see notice below and on our website.

And in community matters, councils around the country are consulting on annual plans. We attended a session in Wellington recently to provide input on Wellington City Council’s proposed priorities – for arts and culture alongside other areas of council responsibility. It was good to see representatives of a wide range of arts, culture and heritage organisations taking part, showing that we are interested and engaged is vital if our value is to be recognised.

Nationally, we have been told that reduced profits from Lotteries will affect the funding available from Creative New Zealand, and presumably also from other Lottery grants Board sources. For an overview, see this article in Non Profit Quarterly. We are keen to know how much this is likely to affect museums and galleries. Please answer these three questions via our surveymonkey poll:

  • will a 10% (or higher) cut in Lottery funding significantly affect your institution?
  • what kind of funding do you currently get from this source?
  • what action, if any, do you think Museums Aotearoa should take on behalf of members?

As always, we welcome your ideas and feedback. We look forward to hearing from you via our poll, and to connecting with many of you at MA16 in Auckland next month.

Ngā mihi

Phillipa and Talei

Support services for the GLAM sector by Tamara Patten

Before I started working in museums, I had a vague idea that a day in the life of a museum worker might involve quietly perusing a shelf of objects, selecting some to put in a display case, then perhaps a bit of dusting. All this would be done whilst wearing a tweed jacket with elbow patches, naturally.

Obviously, as I learned quickly, there is much more to it than that. And we certainly don’t emerge from a museum studies course knowing everything there is to know about caring for a collection, interpreting content, managing museum finances, or running a brilliant public programme. So when you’re curating a new exhibition, or have a water damaged diary to deal with for the first time, how do you find out what to do? For emerging (and sometimes for well-established) museum professionals it can be hard to know where to go for advice.

Get advice on caring for collections and taonga

Get advice on caring for collections and taonga. Photo: Te Papa

Working for National Services Te Paerangi, I’m lucky enough to have a fairly good handle on this. So I thought it might be helpful if I wrote something about where museum professionals can find help and advice – a summary of outreach and support agencies for the GLAM sector.

 

Museums Aotearoa

MA_logo_med

Museums Aotearoa, as you’ll already know, is the professional membership body for the museum sector. Museums Aotearoa provides advocacy and a representative voice for the sector. They host discussion forums on their website, conduct sector research, provide an up-to-date museums directory, and are the place to go if you want to find (or advertise) a job in a New Zealand museum. They also deliver networking events and the museum sector’s annual conference (the next one is in Dunedin in May 2015).

Contact Museums Aotearoa on mail@museumsaotearoa.org.nz

 

National Services Te Paerangi

NSTP-Logo

National Services Te Paerangi works throughout New Zealand in partnership with museums, galleries and iwi, offering a range of practical and strategic programmes aimed at strengthening and building capacity in the sector. NSTP provides museum-related training, small funding grants, online and hardcopy resources, and advice. Regionally-based Museum and Iwi Development Officers can provide on-site, face to face support for your organisation. NSTP is particularly good at making connections between people with a need, and experts who can help.

Contact National Services Te Paerangi on natserv@tepapa.govt.nz or freephone 0508 NSTP HELP

 

NSTP and NPO paper conservation workshop

NSTP and NPO paper conservation workshop. Photo: Te Papa.


Archives New Zealand

Archives NZ logoArchives New Zealand provides training and guidance around working with archives and managing records and information. They can assist with queries around subjects like digitising records, retention and disposal of archives, community archives, and working with the Public Records Act 2005. Later this year they will be launching a new website – Records Toolkit – which will be packed with resources to help with archives and record management. Keep an eye out for it!

Contact Archives New Zealand on rkadvice@dia.govt.nz

 

National Library of New Zealand

Alexander Turnbull Library Master Logo   Two Colour_47919The Alexander Turnbull Library Outreach Services team includes the National Preservation Office. The NPO can help iwi, organisations and individuals with advice on caring for books, archives, photographs, sound recordings and art works. They have a variety of excellent resources online, and can be contacted for advice and assistance. They also hold training workshops on preservation and conservation. Also part of Outreach Services are two oral history advisers who run workshops and provide advice on capturing oral histories.

The National Library is also the home of DigitalNZ. DigitalNZ offers a series of useful online guides to anyone seeking advice on digitising material.

Contact the National Library on information@natlib.govt.nz, the National Preservation Office on preservation@dia.govt.nz, and DigitalNZ on info@digitalnz.org

NSTP digital photography for iwi workshop

NSTP digital photography for iwi workshop. Photo: Te Papa


Job-specific groups

It is also possible to get support and advice by joining a network of people doing a similar job to you. Here is non-exhaustive list of some of the established museum sector groups you could consider joining:

 

Finally, connecting with other local museums is a great way to find support. Time to arrange that coffee date with the friendly person at the museum in the next suburb or town!

Tamara Patten, Communications Officer, National Services Te Paerangi

News Update 2 July 2013

Kia ora,

Matariki and Maori Language week are being celebrated in museums and galleries around the country. Last Saturday I popped into Te Papa to enjoy the buzz of kapa haka groups performing and crowds of people exploring the museum in the breaks, before being drawn back into the main foyer area as the next group began its routine. Check out our facebook page to see posts from museums around the country about how they are celebrating.

Museums Aotearoa Forum in Napier next Thursday
MA Board members want to get out to our members and hear about your ideas for your professional association. The first of a planned series of regional meetings will be on Thursday 11 July, in Napier, hosted by MTG Hawke’s Bay – although they haven’t got a usable building yet so we’re off site in Ahuriri. We are keen to listen to your suggestions and priorities, and provide an opportunity to get together with colleagues without having to travel too far. Anyone interested in hosting a forum, or with particular topics you’d like included, please contact the MA office.

Kaitiaki network
National Services Te Paerangi, with support from Museums Aotearoa, is developing a database of Māori who work in the museum and gallery sector.The Kāhui Kaitiaki Māori database will collate information about Māori working directly in museums and art galleries, indirectly in the sector (for example, experts on taonga), those who have moved out of or across the sector into new roles, and those who are coming into the sector through tertiary or training programmes. The database and subsequent network will include both front and back of house kaimahi (workers), paid and unpaid staff and everyone from volunteers through to Board members.

The collation of this information will assist in the organisation of a Kāhui Kaitiaki hui to be held in Hawke’s Bay on the 11/12/13th of October 2013 with the kaupapa of “Titiro Whakamua”. With the information from the database, we will be more aware of who is working in the sector, and what kaitiaki want to achieve through the hui and the Kāhui Kaitiaki network.

We currently have a student, Matariki Williams, on board to work on this project with our Museums Aotearoa Kaitiaki Māori representative, Tryphena Cracknell. Matariki is interning with National Services Te Paerangi as part of her Masters in Museum and Heritage Studies at Victoria University – contact Matariki to be included.

Tracking Tunnel by Adrienne Grant

Tracking Tunnel by Adrienne Grant

Waikato Museum have an interesting art installation on their forecourt. Here is an image from their facebook page of Tracking Tunnel by Hamilton artist Adrienne Grant – a giant people sized version of the tunnels used by conservation workers.

Massive Theatre performing excerpts from The Brave for CNZ 2013

Massive Theatre performing excerpts from The Brave for CNZ 2013

Last week Talei and Phillipa both attended Creative New Zealand’s conference in Auckland last week – Arts by, with, for young people. With case studies, keynote speakers, academics, practitioners and performers, it was a lively event with lots of good ideas tossed around. we did find it a bit ironic that there were far more young people on the stage than in the audience, which brought home the fact that while the arts are managed by older people, we all need to be fully engaged with the next generations who are our audiences and our inheritors.

Nga mihi,
Phillipa and Talei

News Update 18 June 2013

Kia ora,

Rā whānau ki a koe, Puke Ariki – celebrating their 10th birthday with a party at the weekend. Their Facebook page has lovely photos of their cake and photo competition.

We’re enjoying so many museums celebrating both Matariki and Maori Language week. One collaboration we like – and hope to get to – is Carter Observatory’s planetarium shows featuring a live 30 minute presentation told exclusively in Te Reo, by Khali Philip-Barbara from Te Papa.

MTG Hawke’s Bay’s team member Ken Miles supports the 1957 Grande Bagnante III sculpture as it receives a CT scan. The sculpture fondly known as the “Bather” is by Emilio Greco from the Hawke’s Bay Museums Trust, Ruawharo Tā-ū-rangi collection, 47922.

MTG Hawke’s Bay’s team member Ken Miles supports the 1957 Grande Bagnante III sculpture as it receives a CT scan. The sculpture fondly known as the “Bather” is by Emilio Greco from the Hawke’s Bay Museums Trust, Ruawharo Tā-ū-rangi collection, 47922.

We also liked this photo of a sculpture getting a CT scan from MTG Hawke’s Bay, part of their preparations to move back into their new building.

The Ministry for Culture & Heritage has announced the 2013/14 round of Regional Museums Policy funding with a media release from Minister Christopher Finlayson. He says that about $3 million will be available to assist “regional museums and art galleries that house collections of national significance to improve access to and care of these collections through major construction projects.” Applications close at 5pm on Friday 12 July 2013.

In Australia, a resale royalty scheme was introduced 3 years ago. This requires all resales of art over $1000 to be reported, with a 5% royalty payable to the artist on some sales, and is something that NZ has looked at as well. Now the Australian Copyright Agency is doing a Post Implementation Review, and we’ll be interested to see how the scheme is working.

Northland Museums Association met at Heritage Kaikohe last week, with over 40 people from museums large and small gathering for a presentation by Auckland Museum Director Roy Clare and workshop sessions on governance lead by Lesley Moffat. Its great to see active regional networking, and later this year MA will be convening other meetings around the country. The first is in Napier on 11 July. These will be an opportunity for members to meet, share ideas, hear from speakers, and give feedback to MA Board and staff. Keep an eye on these notices for dates and more details. And if you have a topic you’d like to see discussed in your area, please let us know.

Ngā mihi,
Phillipa and Talei

Karen Verdurmen, Curator at Mercury Bay Museum has come across an Iron Collection found at the Bay Laundromat. Unfortunately this is not something they can keep but Karen wondered if another museum might be interested. They cover the whole era of electric irons. Starting with the ones that had to be put into a light socket. For more information on the collection contact Mercury Bay Museum info@mercurybaymuseum.co.nz.

Karen Verdurmen, Curator at Mercury Bay Museum has come across an Iron Collection found at the Bay Laundromat. Unfortunately this is not something they can keep but Karen wondered if another museum might be interested. They cover the whole era of electric irons. Starting with the ones that had to be put into a light socket. For more information on the collection contact Mercury Bay Museum info@mercurybaymuseum.co.nz.

News Update 4 June 2013

Kia ora,

The new MA Board met for the first time in Wellington on 13 May. We reviewed feedback from the MA13 conference and Kahui Kaitiaki, and planned priority activities for the coming months. We are excited to be working on a series of regional forums for members and museum staff to get together to discuss key issues. The first of these will be in Napier on 11 July.

MA13 conference material is now online, including videos of keynote presentations on YouTube.

We are delighted to see that Auckland Museum, finalist in the 2013 NZ Museum Awards for its energy saving project, is now a finalist in the Green Ribbon Awards to be announced at Parliament tomorrow (World Environment Day).

Dr Ian Griffin, new Director of Otago Museum has told Kathryn Ryan on Radio NZ’s Nine to Noon that ‘museums are absolutely critical to any civilised society’. Listen to the interview to hear more of his background and ideas about museums in general and Otago Museum in particular.

The Museums Australia conference in Canberra was a good opportunity to see how colleagues across the Tasman are dealing with very similar challenges and issues as we are. In some areas they seem to be doing well – while funding is always an issue, the general feeling was positive, and some exciting projects were showcased. In engagement with indigenous and diverse communities there was recognition that there is much that Australia can learn from Aotearoa. Canberra was in celebratory mood, with a year-long programme of festivals and events marking its centenary. While I wasn’t in the right place at the right time to see it floating above the city, Patricia Piccinini’s Skywhale hot-air balloon sculpture occasioned much discussion alongside the more serious conference topics.

Phillipa with The Lady Denman

Phillipa with The Lady Denman

On the way back from Canberra I stopped in at the Lady Denman Maritime Museum in Jervis Bay. I had not planned the visit – it was raining, the museum happened to be well-signposted, and I was looking for a break from driving. While I didn’t wander the extensive grounds and outbuildings because of the rain, there was plenty to see inside besides the centrepiece Sydney Harbour ferry ‘Lady Denman’ (1911-1979) which was built nearby. The museum has the eclectic collection of miscellany you expect in a community museum, including local history, shipwreck stories, and an extensive personal collection of surveyors’ instruments and maritime memorabilia. As a hub for its community, I experienced the strains of the local men’s choir rehearsing, a delightful volunteer who wanted to share her enthusiasm for every aspect of the museum, and could have purchased local art and craft. In addition, I found that the museum manager (and only paid staff member) was MA member Melinda Loe, formerly of Te Papa and more recently the Rocks Discovery Museum in Sydney. Mel has been there a few months now, and would love more visits from fellow New Zealanders.

He tangata, He tangata, He tangata! the theme for National Volunteer week, 16-22 June. This is a special time to recognise and celebrate the wonderful work of volunteers, without whom many museums simply could not operate. See Volunteering NZ for resources and ideas. Also coming up is Maori Language Week, 1-7 July, with the theme Ngā Ingoa Māori – Māori names. Coming alongside Matariki, there are ideas, activities and resources on the Korero Māori website and MLW Facebook page.

Ngā mihi,
Phillipa and Talei

STOP PRESS – MA14 conference, Napier, 2-4 April 2014

Reserve the dates now, and send us your ideas any time. We’ll put out a preliminary call for contributions very soon.

Remembering Rodney Wilson

It is with sadness and respect that we acknowledge the passing of Dr T L Rodney Wilson on 27 April 2013. Rodney was a leader in the museum profession in this country and well known and respected internationally.  He lead many of our museums and galleries, was founding director of Auckland’s National Maritime Museum, retired after 14 years as Director of Auckland War Memorial Museum in 2007, and was made a Fellow of Museums Aotearoa.

 

Rodney Wilson, 2008

Rodney Wilson accepting Fellowship of Museums Aotearoa, April 2008

Rodney’s contribution went far beyond the institutions he worked in.  He was a consultant and advisor to other museums and organisations, including Dunedin City museums review, The Shore exhibition centre in Takapuna, the Army Museum Trust Board, Director of ATTTO, Governor of the Arts Foundation, served on the Museums Aotearoa Board from 2005-2007, as well as holding office with Museums Aotearoa predecessors AGMANZ and AGDC. His services to museum and art gallery administration earned him appointment as a Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit in 2007.

As well as his professional achievements, Rodney will be remembered for his sparkling wit, strength of character, determination and passion – for boats, motorbikes, art, architecture, museums, people and living life to the full.

Rodney had been living with cancer for some time, and died peacefully at home. He will be farewelled in Auckland on Sunday 5 May. On behalf of Museums Aotearoa, I have sent aroha and sympathy to his wife Maureen and to his family.

Phillipa Tocker
Executive Director

Links to other articles:
Auckland Museum’s tribute (includes photos)
Cultural Icons (The Depot)
NZ Herald New Zealander of the Year 2006
Auckland Art Gallery blog (Ron Brownson)
Christchurch Art Gallery blog (Jenny Harper)

Umberto Crenca “The Art of Community”

Finally we have Umberto Crenca’s inspiring keynote address from MA12. “The Art of Community”

Friday 20th April 2012

(note this video includes a presentation by David Cross. Bert’s talk starts at 13:45 in part 1 of 4)

Umberto Crenca – Photo by Pam Murray

Umberto Crenca is the Artistic Director and Co-Founder of AS220, a nonprofit center for the arts in Providence, Rhode Island. AS220 was established in 1985 to provide a local, unjuried, and uncensored home for the arts. The organization maintains three buildings, providing: fifty eight artist live and/or work spaces, four exhibition spaces, a print shop, two darkrooms, a technology lab, a stage, a recording studio, a black box theater, a dance studio, and a popular bar and restaurant. AS220’s permanent establishment in the City’s downtown is widely recognized as one of the first significant steps in the creation of the Providence Arts and Entertainment District.

Umberto Crenca “The Art of Community” – Part 1 of 4 from Museums Aotearoa on Vimeo.

Umberto Crenca “The Art of Community” – Part 2 of 4 from Museums Aotearoa on Vimeo.

Umberto Crenca “The Art of Community” – Part 3 of 4 from Museums Aotearoa on Vimeo.

Umberto Crenca “The Art of Community” – Part 4 of 4 from Museums Aotearoa on Vimeo.


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