Posts Tagged 'NSTP'

Support services for the GLAM sector by Tamara Patten

Before I started working in museums, I had a vague idea that a day in the life of a museum worker might involve quietly perusing a shelf of objects, selecting some to put in a display case, then perhaps a bit of dusting. All this would be done whilst wearing a tweed jacket with elbow patches, naturally.

Obviously, as I learned quickly, there is much more to it than that. And we certainly don’t emerge from a museum studies course knowing everything there is to know about caring for a collection, interpreting content, managing museum finances, or running a brilliant public programme. So when you’re curating a new exhibition, or have a water damaged diary to deal with for the first time, how do you find out what to do? For emerging (and sometimes for well-established) museum professionals it can be hard to know where to go for advice.

Get advice on caring for collections and taonga

Get advice on caring for collections and taonga. Photo: Te Papa

Working for National Services Te Paerangi, I’m lucky enough to have a fairly good handle on this. So I thought it might be helpful if I wrote something about where museum professionals can find help and advice – a summary of outreach and support agencies for the GLAM sector.

 

Museums Aotearoa

MA_logo_med

Museums Aotearoa, as you’ll already know, is the professional membership body for the museum sector. Museums Aotearoa provides advocacy and a representative voice for the sector. They host discussion forums on their website, conduct sector research, provide an up-to-date museums directory, and are the place to go if you want to find (or advertise) a job in a New Zealand museum. They also deliver networking events and the museum sector’s annual conference (the next one is in Dunedin in May 2015).

Contact Museums Aotearoa on mail@museumsaotearoa.org.nz

 

National Services Te Paerangi

NSTP-Logo

National Services Te Paerangi works throughout New Zealand in partnership with museums, galleries and iwi, offering a range of practical and strategic programmes aimed at strengthening and building capacity in the sector. NSTP provides museum-related training, small funding grants, online and hardcopy resources, and advice. Regionally-based Museum and Iwi Development Officers can provide on-site, face to face support for your organisation. NSTP is particularly good at making connections between people with a need, and experts who can help.

Contact National Services Te Paerangi on natserv@tepapa.govt.nz or freephone 0508 NSTP HELP

 

NSTP and NPO paper conservation workshop

NSTP and NPO paper conservation workshop. Photo: Te Papa.


Archives New Zealand

Archives NZ logoArchives New Zealand provides training and guidance around working with archives and managing records and information. They can assist with queries around subjects like digitising records, retention and disposal of archives, community archives, and working with the Public Records Act 2005. Later this year they will be launching a new website – Records Toolkit – which will be packed with resources to help with archives and record management. Keep an eye out for it!

Contact Archives New Zealand on rkadvice@dia.govt.nz

 

National Library of New Zealand

Alexander Turnbull Library Master Logo   Two Colour_47919The Alexander Turnbull Library Outreach Services team includes the National Preservation Office. The NPO can help iwi, organisations and individuals with advice on caring for books, archives, photographs, sound recordings and art works. They have a variety of excellent resources online, and can be contacted for advice and assistance. They also hold training workshops on preservation and conservation. Also part of Outreach Services are two oral history advisers who run workshops and provide advice on capturing oral histories.

The National Library is also the home of DigitalNZ. DigitalNZ offers a series of useful online guides to anyone seeking advice on digitising material.

Contact the National Library on information@natlib.govt.nz, the National Preservation Office on preservation@dia.govt.nz, and DigitalNZ on info@digitalnz.org

NSTP digital photography for iwi workshop

NSTP digital photography for iwi workshop. Photo: Te Papa


Job-specific groups

It is also possible to get support and advice by joining a network of people doing a similar job to you. Here is non-exhaustive list of some of the established museum sector groups you could consider joining:

 

Finally, connecting with other local museums is a great way to find support. Time to arrange that coffee date with the friendly person at the museum in the next suburb or town!

Tamara Patten, Communications Officer, National Services Te Paerangi

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News Update 18 March 2011

Earthquake news still dominates our media – now in Japan as well as Christchurch. Today’s national memorial service in Hagley Park will have been seen or heard by many thousands around the country.

There was a minor press furore as it seemed a Christchurch antique shop might be demolished without any attempt to retrieve items from it – but this seems now to have been done. A small group of people protested yesterday about the apparent demolition of some buildings without the owners or occupiers knowing or being given a chance to salvage anything. Authorities are gradually allowing access where possible and clearing vehicles from the CBD. As well as the mainstream news media, there is lots of activity on blogs, local websites and Facebook.

Much of the Christchurch CBD still has a closed ‘red zone’, staff have not yet been able to return to Christchurch Art Gallery or Canterbury Museum, and COCA trustees have made the decision to close indefinitely – and have made all the staff redundant. Sumner and Lyttelton museum collections have been removed prior to probable demolition of both buildings. The future restoration of other heritage buildings is as yet unknown, including the Arts Centre. In the mean time, the Air Force Museum is open, and helping fellow museums as well as several other displaced organisations.

We have had numerous offers of help, mostly expertise, person power, fundraising ideas, or respite from CHCH. At this stage there is limited scope for extra people to help on the ground. Judith Taylor and Ian Wards of National Services Te Paerangi will be helping COCA to pack up its collection and prepare for an ‘indeterminate period’ of closure. There is little more that can be done from outside Christchurch until Canterbury Museum and Christchurch Art Gallery staff get back into their buildings to undertake a careful assessment and plan for recovery. Until that time, we thank all those who have made generous offers, and we know that many have already been able to help their friends and colleagues personally as well.

There is other news of course. In the UK, some simmering disquiet about the fate of gifted items held in the British Empire and Commonwealth Museum has resulted in the dismissal of its director and a pending police investigation, read about it here. This collection includes items presented to Britain by New Zealand, and raises important questions which align with the planned collection ethics discussion at MA11 in Nelson.

News Update 10 February 2011

The latest batch of museum news is online here (you need to be logged in to the members’ area to view). We’re a couple of days late with the latest news as we’ve been away in Rotorua. The Museums Aotearoa Board met on Tuesday, hosted in fine style by Rotorua Museum. We really appreciated their cheerful hospitality as well as their air conditioning – it felt like about 30 degrees outside, especially to those of us from further south! and it was great to have an opportunity to see their re-development progress, which is on track towards a successful opening on 20 August.

Museums Aotearoa Board Members inspecting progress at Rotorua Museum

We also really enjoyed meeting with members from the area, some of whom had driven quite some distance to be there. We had afternoon tea and a good discussion of current issues and projects, including the work towards accreditation for museums and galleries in New Zealand. This is an important development in encouraging and recognising best practice standards in all museum and galleries, whatever their size. Another topic of discussion was a review of the Code of Ethics. We will have discussion papers about both these projects circulated for debate at the AGM in April.

MA11 conference planning has been taking much of our time, with details of the 3-day programme on Collecting Culture being finalised. Our hosts at Nelson Provincial Museum and the Suter are looking forward to welcoming colleagues to their place, and to their region. The first day of the conference will be held at the pan-iwi Whakatū Marae which will provide an ideal setting to explore bicultural collections. Thursday and Friday will be at various venues, including the Suter and Nelson Provincial Museum, with the Awards dinner at Nelson School of Music. The conference will be followed by a BarCamp convened by National Services Te Paerangi on Saturday 16 April. More details and registration information are on our website, make sure you register before 25 February to take advantage of the Early Bird Discount. And don’t forget, National Services have travel subsidies available, specifically to assist smaller organisations to attend MA11. These are being administered via the Helping Hand Grants, click here for application forms.

Here in Wellington, talk is focussed on politics. Controversy within the Māori Party is hotly debated, as well as the second reading of the new Marine and Coastal Area (Takutai Moana) Bill. This Bill is being brought to the House by Hon Christopher Finlayson, as Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations. Being Attorney General as well as the Arts, Culture & Heritage portfolio, our Minister is a very busy man. Currently before the parliament he also has the Cultural Property (Protection in Armed Conflict) Bill (to enable NZ to ratify an international convention), the Arts Council of New Zealand Toi Aotearoa Bill (which re-jigs the Arts Council and its committees), the Ngā Wai o Maniapoto (Waipa River) Bill, Ngā Rohe Moana o Ngā Hapū o Ngāti Porou Bill, a Legislation Bill and a Whanganui Iwi Bill.

On top of all this, the General Election has been set for 26 November this year. So it is even more vital that issues for the museum and gallery sector are well-understood by politicians on all sides of the debate. Museums Aotearoa keeps in contact with various ministers and MPs, in government and in opposition. Next week we have another meeting with Hon Christopher Finlayson, and we’re delighted that he will address the MA11 conference at the closing session on Friday 15 April.

This month deadlines are looming for conference registration and awards entries. More details are on our website, or contact us at the Museums Aotearoa office in Wellington.

Ka kite,

Phillipa and Sophie

News Update

Kia ora

Check out the latest batch of museum news that has been uploaded today, online here (you need to be logged in to the members’ area to view). This is a slim edition due our special ahead-of-schedule news last week (which now has an index online to view).

The media over the last week has shown us a roller coaster of images and news from Canterbury. We are all extremely relieved that no lives were lost and there was relatively little damage to museum and gallery collections. Serious damage will need to be dealt with at Kaiapoi Museum and the Logie Collection at Canterbury University, and many heritage buildings are damaged or still awaiting assessment. We also feel for all the private owners and collectors whose treasures have been lost.

However, major institutions such as Canterbury Museum, Christchurch Art Gallery and the Air Force Museum have come through almost unscathed. The art gallery staff are this week cleaning up after hosting civil defence HQ, in readiness for reopening to the public along with other Christchurch institutions such as Ballantynes.

There is a huge job to be done to repair and clean up across the affected region, not to mention the emotional and psychological healing that will be required. It is great to see groups such as NZ Conservators of Cultural Materials and NZ Institute of Architects stepping up and offering help, as well as the Canterbury Disaster Salvage team and many other individuals and organisations. National Services Te Paerangi has several useful links and contacts up on their website worth checking out. We wish everyone involved a speedy recovery.

Meanwhile, the wheels of government continue to turn. We notice there have been significant changes made to the LEOTC funding model this year, and it will be interesting to see what this looks like for the museum sector in both the short and long term. The most obvious change is a move away from annual tender rounds based on specific ‘learning areas’ of the curriculum, allowing proposals for any learning area to be submitted. The other notable change appears to be a greater regional emphasis in the selection process. Also any new contracts entered into over the next two years will have an end date of June 2013 to bring all contracts into the same cycle and ” to pave the way for the new contracting environment”. There is information about these changes on the LEOTC website here, and the current tender document (number 30798) is available on the government electronic tendering service website here, for download.

And in Auckland the framework for the new Auckland City is now in place, ready for the new council to take up the reins following the October elections. The Board for Regional Facilities Auckland, the new ‘super-CCO’ group responsible for Auckland Art Gallery alongside the zoo and various stadia and events centres, has been announced, Appointees include Sir Don McKinnon as Chair, with Dame Jenny Gibbs as Deputy Chair. Regional Facilities Auckland is expected in future to also be responsible for the Auckland Museum and MOTAT, as well as Voyager Maritime Museum and others currently under the Auckland Regional Amenities Act, further details are available online here.

There have been Mayoral debates in several cities, and some interesting statements by candidates. So keep in touch with goings-on in local politics and make sure you vote for your local councillors who actively support arts, culture and heritage. Many candidates have profiles on the national election website or visit www.localgovt.co.nz for links to all local councils as well as news and other useful links.

Best wishes to all, especially our friends in Canterbury,

ka kite,

Phillipa and Sophie


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