Posts Tagged 'Whangarei Art Museum'

NZ Museum Awards finalists

3 April 2012

New museum developments, innovative projects and excellent exhibitions will be recognised in the 2012 New Zealand Museum Awards.  Winners will be named from among 15 finalists at a gala dinner in Wellington on 19 April celebrating the fifth annual national museum awards. 

The selection panel, including guest judges Jock Phillips and Heather Galbraith, had a hard job selecting from the record number of entries. ‘The panel had some robust debate about which entries were most deserving, which is why we have such a large number of finalists’, says Phillipa Tocker, Executive Director of Museums Aotearoa. ‘We are delighted at the quality and quantity of these projects.’

A new feature this year is the category of ‘museum and gallery development’, which recognises some major capital projects completed recently.  While the scale of the finalists ranges from the Auckland Art Gallery rebuild and MOTAT Aviation Display Hall to more modest developments at Te Manawa and Whangarei Art Museum, each was a significant challenge which has exceeded expectations. 

In the innovation and new technology category, the judges have recognised mobile phone and online projects at Auckland Museum and Christchurch Art Gallery, and Waikato Museum’s innovative temporary wall system that addresses the issue of waste and sustainability for changing exhibitions.

The exhibition category drew the most entries, and the judges were attracted to those which stretched both the institution and the audience.  Challenging subjects were explored by Museums Wellington with Death and Diversity, and Dunedin Public Art Gallery in Still Life: The Art of Anatomy.  Other challenges were logistical, with Aratoi working with iwi to borrow a significant waka from Te Papa for Wairarapa Moana, and Luit Bieringa successfully encompassing 125 years of design in a free-standing exhibition Old School New School for Massey University in Wellington.

Christchurch museums were back in the awards this year with exhibitions from Canterbury Museum and Christchurch Art Gallery.  Both affected by and developed as a result of the earthquakes, Canterbury Quakes and De-Building offered visitors exciting ways of exploring and learning from their effects.

The other major national event of 2011 was recognised in Red, Yellow and (All) Black developed by Waikato Museum.  Among so many rugby-related offerings, the judges agreed that this exhibition stood out as engaging and user-friendly for all kinds of visitors. 

The award judges, Jock Phillips, Heather Galbraith, Greg McManus and Jane Legget, said that the entries exercised and impressed them.  ‘It is rewarding to see so many creative and exciting projects being produced despite – or in spite of – the financial and other challenges facing our public museums and galleries,’ said Phillipa Tocker, ‘the announcement of the winners on 19 April will be a wonderful celebration of their achievements.’

The New Zealand Museum Awards dinner at City Gallery Wellington is part of Museums Aotearoa’s MA12 conference, Collaboration in practice.  The awards programme is proudly sponsored by Story Inc, New Zealand’s leading creator of visitor experiences.

New Zealand Museum Awards 2012 Finalists 

Finalist                Project
Aratoi exhibition: Wairarapa Moana
Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki project: gallery redevelopment
Auckland War Memorial Museum project: AQUA mobile trail
Canterbury Museum exhibition: Canterbury Quakes
Christchurch Art Gallery
Te Puna o Waiwhetu
online project: MyGallery
Christchurch Art Gallery
Te Puna o Waiwhetu
exhibition: De-Building
Dunedin Public Art Gallery exhibition: Still Life: The Art of Anatomy
Luit Bieringa exhibition: Old School New School
Museum of Transport
and Technology
project: Aviation Display Hall development
Museum of Wellington
City & Sea
exhibition: Death and Diversity
New Zealand Historic Places Trust project: Pompallier Mission
& Fyffe House interpretation
Te Manawa Museums Trust project: Te Manawa development
Waikato Museum project: temporary exhibition wall fabrication system
Waikato Museum exhibition: Red, Yellow, (All) Black
Whangarei Art Museum
Te Manawa Toi
project: Whangarei Art Museum
Relocation/Rebrand
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News Update 25 November 2011

This is a slightly late update on our week to 25 Nov, where we were out and about. Phillipa went to the Northland Museums Association meeting hosted by the Kauri Museum on 18 November. It was great to hear about happenings in the north, and we had an inspiring presentation from dendrochronologist Dr Jonathan Palmer. As the Kauri Museum’s first Scientist in Residence, Jonathan is working on dating trees and timber, using Northland kauri and material from the museum, relating the information to historical climate change.

While in the area, Phillipa also visited the new Te Ahu complex in Kaitaia – a mere two hundred kilometers away. We looked at preparations to move the Far North Regional Museum displays into the new complex with the library, i-Site and council service centre – the old museum will be retained for storage.

Phil Cross and Don Hammond in the new Te Ahu foyer
Phil Cross and Don Hammond in the Te Ahu foyer

Then it was on to Whangarei to visit the Whangarei Art Museum in its new preimses in ‘The Hub’ in central Whangarei. Along with more than twice the exhibition space, good climate control and a proper storage area, Scott Pothan and his team have had a huge increase in visitors – including a function for the Prime Minister last week.

Yesterday we held a members forum and today the Board met, both hosted by the Air Force Museum in Christchurch. Chair Thérèse Angelo and Phillipa discussed museums matters with the Council of Australasian Museum Directors (CAMD), who were also meeting in Christchurch yeasterday. It was great to meet and talk with colleagues from Timaru, Okains Bay and Leeston as well as Christchurch and Australia.


Dave, Darren and Jocelyn, some of our Air Force Museum hosts

And Friday 25 November will be remembered by everyone at the Air Force Museum – the diggers arrived to dig up the tarmac next to the museum building, the first evidence that their long-awaited new building is going ahead at last. The reason you can hardly see the digger is that the scale of the new aircraft hall is enormous!


Digging up the tarmac at the Air Force Museum

A+ Awards
ATTTO celebrated the inaugural A+ Awards on 11 November, recognising the effort and achievement of trainees in all the sectors it covers. Virginia Malcomson from Canterbury Museum carried away the award for Museum Trainee of the Year – Virginia completed the Museum Pracitice Certificate in super-quick time, at a very high standard, while living through the upheavel of the Christchurch earthquakes both at home and at work. You can see photos of the event on ATTTO’s Facebook page. Congratulations Virginia!

Te Papa vision
The next stage of consultation on Te Papa’s vision for the future is now underway. Following the high level vision ‘Changing hearts, Changing minds, Changing lives’, which was widely discussed in August, this round explores Te Papa’s proposed programmes of development. The programmes are outlined here and you are invited to submit your feedback online. Te Papa is hoping to get a really good community cross section, and will be running the consultation through until mid December, but welcomes feedback at any time as the comments can also be helpful as programmes are developed in more detail. There is also a report on feedback received on the high level vision in September available for download.

Opportunities
There are some great internships and other opportunities coming up. Auckland Art Gallery is calling for applications for its Marylyn Mayo Internship by 7 December, and MA will shortly be opening applications for the 2012 Clark Collection/Creative New Zealand and Mina McKenzie Scholarships, which will be due in late January.

 

News Update 11 August 2011

Southland Museum and Art Gallery has attracted much comment after a letter to the Editor of the Southland Times calling an exhibition of Ralph Hotere drawings ‘trash’ and ‘not appropriate for young adults’.  It’s good to see people taking an interest in their local museums and galleries, and that the letter drew extremely supportive responses from other readers!  You can read these and other news stories in the members’ area of our website here (you need to be an MA member to log in).

Activity around the country
Around the country everyone is gearing up for – or hiding away from – that sporting event which will overtake us from 9 September.  Museums and galleries have been making special efforts to put on great shows such as the inspiring and wide-ranging 2-part exhibition exploring currents of art throughout the Pacific, Oceania at Te Papa and City Gallery Wellington.  And there is a flurry of activity as opening dates loom for Auckland Art Gallery, Rotorua Museum, the relocated Whangarei Art Museum, and the NZ Rugby Museum in its new home at the redeveloped Te Manawa.

You can check out these and all the other cultural activities being promoted to our rugby visitors as part of the REAL New Zealand Festival.

Mix and Mash is here again – Digital NZ has opened a competition with $40,000 in cash and prizes for the best mashup and remix of NZ content and data. There is online information and tutorials, and you are encouraged to take part in the discussions. There was also an actual launch event in Auckland on 4 August.  The competition is open until 15 September, with winners to be annouced on 3 October.  Visit the Digital NZ mixandmash website for details.

People in the news
We all know that museum and gallery people are interesting, although we don’t always know about the things that our colleagues do outside of work time. One such person is Jennie McCormick, customer services officer at Te Tuhi. Jennie’s alter ego is an amateur astronomer, and was the subject of Radio NZ’s Spectrum documentary last week, which you can listen to here.

Also on the radio was Tina Barton, Director of the Adam Art Gallery, talking about their current show Behind Closed Doors, which brings artworks from private collectors’ homes into the gallery. You can listen to Tina on The Arts on Sunday, 31 July.  Other recent Radio NZ interviews have been with Scott Pothan (Whangarei Art Museum), Douglas Lloyd Jenkins (Hawke’s Bay Museum & Art Gallery) and Bill Macnaught (National Library, ex-Puke Ariki).

Diversity in focus
And a reminder about the museums and galleries session which is part of the Diversity Forum in Hamilton on 22 August.  This is a great opportunity to spend some time focussing on professional practice with interested colleagues.  You can download the flyer and registration information here.  I’m looking forward to seeing many of you there.

Nga mihi,
Phillipa

News Update 30 June 2011

Registration is now open for the 10th National Digital Forum (NDF) conference at Te Papa in November, and the first international keynote speaker has been confirmed. If you’re quick, you could register online before the end of the June financial year. Visit the NDF website for details here.

This month, Christchurch continues to struggle to find a ‘new normal’ as continuing aftershocks make people feel they’re going one step forward, two steps back. The recent announcment of residential ‘red zones’ seems to be causing even more uncertainty while insurance and logistics are worked out. There have been useful discussions amongst culture and heritage organisations, and we hope that there will be some progress for museums and galleries there soon.

In New Plymouth, Minister the Hon Christopher Finlayson has announced $4million towards the planned Len Lye Centre from the Regional Museums Fund, adding to other pledged support. Patterson Architects are appointed and more information and an image of the proposed centre can be found here.

Further north, the Whangarei Art Museum is closing its doors on the 4th of July, 15 years after its opening in the former Plunket Rooms in the Rose Garden at Cafler Park. They will spend the next two months packing and moving to exciting new preimses in The Hub in the Town Basin, where the art museum will reopen on the 13th of September.

The Kauri Museum has just launched a series of three video movies on the kauri industry which are now on permanent show the Museum in Matakohe. The Speaker, Rt Hon Lockwood Smith, made a keynote address at a ‘premiere’, citing the movies as a vital educational resource. The videos on DVD are the work of Kiwi film-maker Tom Williamson, who has sourced rare film footage from searches in the national archives, Alexander Turnbull Library and National Film Unit, and include interviews with survivors who worked during the last days of the tree felling, and with people involved in restoring the damage today. Kauri – The Timber tells of how the huge trees were felled in the bush and transported to the sawmills; Kauri – The Gum relates how the swamps were worked and the product was collected and sold, while Kauri – Heart of the Forest, Soul of a Nation, tells how attitudes changed from ruthless timber extraction to total protection.


Derek Hope (Chairman), Dr The Rt Hon Lockwood Smith, Betty Nelley (Curator)
and Tom Williamson (Film Producer) at The Kauri Museum DVD launch.

Looking overseas, the British Museum has won the UK’s biggest museum sector prize, the £100,000 Art Fund Prize. The winning project is its ambitious and far-reaching ‘A History of the World’ project which examines 100 collection objects chronologically presented via the internet, radio broadcasts and a book, developed in partnership with the BBC and a huge number of other contributors. Michael Portillo, who chaired the judges, said: “We were particularly impressed by the truly global scope of the British Museum’s project, which combined intellectual rigour and open heartedness, and went far beyond the boundaries of the museum’s walls. Above all, we felt that this project, which showed a truly pioneering use of digital media, has led the way for museums to interact with their audiences in new and different ways. Without changing the core of the British Museum’s purpose, people have and are continuing to engage with objects in an innovative way as a consequence of this project.” Radio NZ National has been broadcasting four 15-minute segments each week after The Arts on Sunday, and you can visit the BM website here to listen to the broadcasts, view the objects and read more information.

Last week we saw extraordinary media images of Vancouver erupting in riots after the loss of an ice hockey match. Now the Museum of Vancouver is planning to collect and document, if not keep, all the plywood panels that have boarded up the broken windows – they have become a ‘citizen wall’, a kind of instant message board covered in graffiti and messages about the riots, a place for anonymous expressions of remorse, solidarity and pride in the city. See news reports here and here. I wonder if what would happen in NZ if we lost the rugby world cup final to Australia – and how would our museums respond?

Nga mihi,
Phillipa


Aratoi Museum of Art & History Friends’ Residency

The Friends of Aratoi – Wairarapa Museum of Art and History are sponsoring a new residency at Wairarapa’s New Pacific Studio, Kaiparoro Historic House, RD 1, Mount Bruce, Masterton, New Zealand. The residency is of one to four week’s duration and worth $NZ1000. It enables NZ visual artists, writers or historians the opportunity to live in a tranquil yet stimulating rural environment with many facilities – such as broadband, an excellent library and a well-appointed kitchen plus private and very well-appointed studio/study spaces where their creativity can thrive and their projects can be worked on. Applications should be received by NPS by the end of August, 2011, and the residency is available to be taken up between December 2011 and May 2012. For further information consult www.newpacificstudio.org


Centenary of the First World War

We are fast approaching the major milestones of the centenary of the First World War: August, 2014 sees the centenary of the outbreak of the World War I, and April, 2015 the 100th anniversary of the Gallipoli landings. Over the next few years many organisations will be busy planning and executing an ambitious programme to mark these dates, and the many centenary observances that will occur, through to the 100th anniversary of the signing of the Armistice, in November 2018.

The Ministry of Culture and Heritage has embarked on a government-led initiative to coordinate and inspire cooperation within the GLAMs and education sectors. At their suggestion and in consultation with Te Papa, Auckland War memorial Museum will host a day-long workshop, brainstorm and symposium on Centenary Planning, to be held on 21 July 2011. This will be a chance to share what your institution is thinking about during these crucial early planning stages, to hear what your colleagues are doing and to perhaps inspire partnerships and shared resources to create a worthwhile programme for all New Zealanders. We will also have some guest speakers to share what is being planned on a national and international level.

Further opportunities for discussion and planning will be arranged later in the year. Please contact Russell Briggs, Director of Exhibitions and Programmes, at rbriggs@aucklandmuseum.com or ring him on 09 302 3992 if you are interested.


PSA Banner competition

The Museum of Wellington City and Sea is working with the Public Service Association to manage a national competition for artists, designers and makers to submit entries for a new banner to mark the PSA’s Centenary in 2013. There is a prize of up to $15,000. The Museum will be touring the winning entries in 2013 and welcomes enquires.

For details and entry forms for the contest: http://psa.org.nz/Centenary.aspx
For exhibition and touring details: paul.thompson@wmt.org.nz

News update 14 June 2011

While preparing this post, we heard about the latest earthquakes to rock Christchurch. We were saddened to hear that the Timeball Station has suffered very badly, especially as the delicate task of dismantling had just begun. As yet we don’t know how other museums and galleries have fared. We send supportive thoughts and aroha to all our friends and colleagues in Canterbury.

Queen’s Birthday Honours

Last week we were delighted to hear that Thérèse Angelo and Jenny Harper were both appointed Members of the New Zealand Order of Merit in the Queen’s Birthday Honours. Congratulations to both. We are lucky to have them on the Museums Aotearoa Board, with Thérèse taking on the role of Chair following the April AGM.

It is always gratifying to see the service of dedicated individuals recognised, as it highlights the value of their work and that of the wider cultural sector. Also honoured were several other supporters of the arts and heritage, including Asia NZ Foundation Culture Director Jennifer King, arts patron Sir James Wallace, Te Papa Board member Chris Parkin and the late Desmond Templeton, founder of the Templeton Flax Mill Heritage Museum in Riverton.

Reports and plans

Annual reporting and planning season is upon us again. Reports and plans provide insight into how different organisations evaluate their performance and look to the future.

The Museums Aotearoa 2010 Annual Report was presented at the AGM in Nelson, and recently mailed out with the May MAQ. All members should have received it by now – if you haven’t yet seen it, please let us know. The Annual and complete Financial reports can also be downloaded from our website here.

Other interesting and useful reports and plans include:

The recently released edition of the Regional Visitor Monitor (RVM) data for the year ended March 2011 includes a Quarterly Focus article dedicated to the importance of the domestic market segment to the New Zealand tourism industry. It examines the key differences of the domestic travel market between the eight distinct groups of ‘domestic leisure travellers’, each with its own travel needs and patterns, and each requiring a different marketing approach. To visit the RVM section of the Tourism Research website and download the Domestic Market Segmentation report and/or the RVM data and report click here.

Museums and galleries online

The Govett-Brewster Art Gallery has had an online makeover – completely redesigned and with new information, functions and images, the here.

Ka kite,
Phillipa

PS – Sophie is away on leave this month, I hope she’s having a great time on her travels!

News Update

Kia ora

Check out the latest batch of museum news that has been uploaded today, online here (you need to be logged in to the members’ area to view). This is currently online as a downloadable PDF, index will follow shortly.

Another busy fortnight, and we’ve been out and about. Both Sophie and I visited Auckland privately, and squeezed in some museum visiting while we were there. I had a quick look at the Walters Prize exhibition at Auckland Art Gallery, and visited the new home of the Wallace Arts Trust, the TSB Bank Wallace Arts Centre at Pah Homestead, where finalists in the 2010 Wallace Art Awards are on show until 3 October before travelling to TheNewDowse (opening 22 October). While we await the announcement of the Walters Prize on 8 October, interviews with the four finalists can be found online here and you can also vote for the ‘Peoples Choice’.

Last week I spent a very enjoyable 2 days in the Far North with the Northland Museums Association. Heritage Kaikohe hosted the meeting, and treated some 40 visitors to train rides as well as warm hospitality and a cosy fire. Serious discussion of museum strategies, national and local issues took up most of Friday, with a little time for local politics as well. The NMA is made up of a wide variety of museums, from the council-owned Whangarei Art Museum, to the independent Kauri Museum, and volunteer-run Hokianga Historical Society (Omapere). They span tourist areas such as Russell and country towns like Kaikohe.

It was sad to hear about Omapere having to move their collections into containers after the building they shared with the i-Site was declared unsafe, although Alexa tells me they have now been offered space at the local school. We wish Far North Regional Museum all the best as they negotiate their way forward as part of the Te Ahu complex, Shirley and friends at the Jack Morgan a successful opening and a well-deserved breather, and Mangawhai Museum success in raising funds to put a roof on top of their newly-built walls and floor. All in the NMA show great enterprise and enthusiasm. Best wishes also to Scott as Chair, Eileen as secretary, and Lynda for her work as out-going secretary. And a big thank-you to all the folk at Heritage Kaikohe for their hospitality, especially Ian, Heather and Trevor.

NMA members take the Heritage Kaikohe train, driven by Trevor Bedggood (photo: Don Hammond/Far North Regional Museum)

I have also been out and about as a ‘lay’ juror for the Wellington branch NZ Institute of Architecture Awards. I’ve seen some really inspiring spaces, both public and private. This has afforded a fascinating insight into how awards work from the selectors’ perspective – very timely as we begin work on growing the Museum Awards for 2011. Watch out for notice of criteria and entry opportunities before the end of the year.

With the school holidays now underway, many museums will be busy with holiday programmes and lots of families visiting. And Auckland is in the thick of its Heritage Festival, with lots of museums and galleries taking part. The festival runs from 18 September to 3 October, click here for details. Further south the biannual Otago Festival of the Arts is coming up 8-17 October, including theatre performances at Otago Settlers Museum and exhibitions at Dunedin Public Art Gallery as well as lots of other dance, theatre and music events. We hope you all have lots of visitors and lots of fun.

Nga mihi,

Phillipa and Sophie

PS – don’t forget to vote for your local mayor and council!

“No one can be forced to vote. However, it’s vitally important that those of us who can, make the effort to do so, even if it only goes so far as reading the voter’s guide that comes with your voting paper before deciding whose name to put a tick beside. If nothing else, to most people’s minds, anyone who chooses not to vote also loses their mandate to complain over the next three years when decisions are made which they do not agree with.”
(Race to be mayor springs into life, Bay of Plenty Times, 25 September 2010)

Ian Wards, Phillipa Tocker, Heather Ayrton and Ian Day at Heritage Kaikohe (photo: Don Hammond/Far North Regional Museum)


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